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Integrative taxonomy: Combining morphological, molecular and chemical data for species delineation in the parthenogenetic Trhypochthonius tectorum complex (Acari, Oribatida, Trhypochthoniidae)

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, February 2011
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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57 Dimensions

Readers on

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118 Mendeley
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Title
Integrative taxonomy: Combining morphological, molecular and chemical data for species delineation in the parthenogenetic Trhypochthonius tectorum complex (Acari, Oribatida, Trhypochthoniidae)
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, February 2011
DOI 10.1186/1742-9994-8-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael Heethoff, Michael Laumann, Gerd Weigmann, Günther Raspotnig

Abstract

There is a long-standing controversial about how parthenogenetic species can be defined in absence of a generally accepted species concept for this reproductive mode. An integrative approach was suggested, combining molecular and morphological data to identify distinct monophyletic entities. Using this approach, speciation of parthenogenetic lineages was recently demonstrated for groups of bdelloid rotifers and oribatid mites. Trhypochthonius tectorum, an oribatid mite from the entirely parthenogenetic desmonomatan family Trhypochthoniidae, is traditionally treated as a single species in Central Europe. However, two new morphological lineages were recently proposed for some Austrian populations of T. tectorum, and were described as novel subspecies (T. silvestris europaeus) or form (T. japonicus forma occidentalis). We used the morphological and morphometrical data which led to this separation, and added mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences and the chemical composition of complex exocrine oil gland secretions to test this taxonomical hypothesis. This is the first attempt to combine these three types of data for integrative taxonomical investigations of oribatid mites.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 2 2%
Portugal 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 112 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 30 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 18%
Student > Master 16 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Other 22 19%
Unknown 9 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 78 66%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 9%
Environmental Science 10 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 <1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 13 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2013.
All research outputs
#816,353
of 3,635,018 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#96
of 215 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,073
of 95,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#5
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,635,018 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 215 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.6. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 95,657 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.