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The association between consecutive days’ heat wave and cardiovascular disease mortality in Beijing, China

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

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45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
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Title
The association between consecutive days’ heat wave and cardiovascular disease mortality in Beijing, China
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4129-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qian Yin, Jinfeng Wang

Abstract

Although many studies have examined the effects of heat waves on the excess mortality risk (ER) posed by cardiovascular disease (CVD), scant attention has been paid to the effects of various combinations of differing heat wave temperatures and durations. We investigated such effects in Beijing, a city of over 20 million residents. A generalized additive model (GAM) was used to analyze the ER of consecutive days' exposure to extreme high temperatures. A key finding was that when extremely high temperatures occur continuously, at varying temperature thresholds and durations, the adverse effects on CVD mortality vary significantly. The longer the heat wave lasts, the greater the mortality risk is. When the daily maximum temperature exceeded 35 °C from the fourth day onward, the ER attributed to consecutive days' high temperature exposure saw an increase to about 10% (p < 0.05), and at the fifth day, the ER even reached 51%. For the thresholds of 32 °C, 33 °C, and 34 °C, from the fifth day onward, the ER also rose sharply (16, 29, and 31%, respectively; p < 0.05). In addition, extreme high temperatures appeared to contribute to a higher proportion of CVD deaths among elderly persons, females and outdoor workers. When the daily maximum temperature was higher than 33 °C from the tenth consecutive day onward, the ER of CVD death among these groups was 94, 104 and 149%, respectively (p < 0.05), which is considerably higher than the ER for the overall population (87%; p < 0.05). The results of this study may assist governments in setting standards for heat waves, creating more accurate heat alerts, and taking measures to prevent or reduce temperature-related deaths, especially against the backdrop of global warming.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 57 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Master 5 9%
Other 3 5%
Other 12 21%
Unknown 8 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 17 29%
Social Sciences 7 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2017.
All research outputs
#5,609,976
of 17,366,233 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,109
of 11,736 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,269
of 374,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,366,233 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,736 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 374,859 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them