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A comprehensive study on cellular RNA editing activity in response to infections with different subtypes of influenza a viruses

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, January 2018
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Title
A comprehensive study on cellular RNA editing activity in response to infections with different subtypes of influenza a viruses
Published in
BMC Genomics, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-017-4330-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yingying Cao, Ruiyuan Cao, Yaowei Huang, Hongxia Zhou, Yuanhua Liu, Xuan Li, Wu Zhong, Pei Hao

Abstract

RNA editing is an important mechanism that expands the diversity and complexity of genetic codes. The conversions of adenosine (A) to inosine (I) and cytosine (C) to uridine (U) are two prominent types of RNA editing in animals. The roles of RNA editing events have been implicated in important biological pathways. Cellular RNA editing activity in response to influenza A virus infection has not been fully characterized in human and avian hosts. This study was designed as a big data analysis to investigate the role and response of RNA editing in epithelial cells during the course of infection with various subtypes of influenza A viruses. Using a bioinformatics pipeline modified from our previous study, we characterized the profiles of A-to-I and C-to-U RNA editing events in human epithelial cells during the course of influenza A virus infection. Our results revealed a striking diversity of A-to-I RNA editing activities in human epithelial cells in responses to different subtypes of influenza A viruses. The infection of H1N1 and H3N2 significantly up-regulated normalized A-to-I RNA editing levels in human epithelial cells, whereas that of H5N1 did not change it and H7N9 infection significantly down-regulated normalized A-to-I editing level in A549 cells. Next, the expression levels of ADAR and APOBEC enzymes responsible for A-to-I and C-to-U RNA editing during the course of virus infection were examined. The increase of A-to-I RNA editing activities in infections with some influenza A viruses (H1N1 and H3N2) is linked to the up-regulation of ADAR1 but not ADAR2. Further, the pattern recognition receptors of human epithelial cells infected with H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 were examined. Variable responsive changes in gene expression were observed with RIG-I like receptors and Toll like receptors. Finally, the effect of influenza A virus infection on cellular RNA editing activity was also analyzed in avian hosts. This work represents the first comprehensive study of cellular RNA editing activity in response to different influenza A virus infections in human and avian hosts, highlighting the critical role of RNA editing in innate immune response and the pathogenicity of different subtypes of influenza A viruses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 19%
Researcher 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 5 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 20%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 13%
Chemistry 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,424,559
of 13,444,601 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,952
of 7,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#197,071
of 348,866 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#17
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,444,601 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,882 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,866 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.