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Modifiable risk factors associated with prediabetes in men and women: a cross-sectional analysis of the cohort study in primary health care on the evolution of patients with prediabetes (PREDAPS-Study…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
194 Mendeley
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Title
Modifiable risk factors associated with prediabetes in men and women: a cross-sectional analysis of the cohort study in primary health care on the evolution of patients with prediabetes (PREDAPS-Study)
Published in
BMC Family Practice, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12875-014-0216-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alicia Díaz-Redondo, Carolina Giráldez-García, Lourdes Carrillo, Rosario Serrano, Francisco Javier García-Soidán, Sara Artola, Josep Franch, Javier Díez, Patxi Ezkurra, José Manuel Millaruelo, Mateu Seguí, Javier Sangrós, Juan Martínez-Candela, Pedro Muñoz, Albert Goday, Enrique Regidor

Abstract

BackgroundPrediabetes is a high-risk state for diabetes development, but little is known about the factors associated with this state. The aim of the study was to identify modifiable risk factors associated with the presence of prediabetes in men and women.MethodsCohort Study in Primary Health Care on the Evolution of Patients with Prediabetes (PREDAPS-Study) is a prospective study on a cohort of 1184 subjects with prediabetes and another cohort of 838 subjects without glucose metabolism disorders. It is being conducted by 125 general practitioners in Spain. Data for this analysis were collected during the baseline stage in 2012. The modifiable risk factors included were: smoking habit, alcohol consumption, low physical activity, inadequate diet, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity. To assess independent association between each factor and prediabetes, odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression models.ResultsAbdominal obesity, low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-cholesterol), and hypertension were independently associated with the presence of prediabetes in both men and women. After adjusting for all factors, the respective ORs (95% Confidence Intervals) were 1.98 (1.41-2.79), 1.88 (1.23-2.88) and 1.86 (1.39-2.51) for men, and 1.89 (1.36-2.62), 1.58 (1.12-2.23) and 1.44 (1.07-1.92) for women. Also, general obesity was a risk factor in both sexes but did not reach statistical significance among men, after adjusting for all factors. Risky alcohol consumption was a risk factor for prediabetes in men, OR 1.49 (1.00-2.24).ConclusionsObesity, low HDL-cholesterol levels, and hypertension were modifiable risk factors independently related to the presence of prediabetes in both sexes. The magnitudes of the associations were stronger for men than women. Abdominal obesity in both men and women displayed the strongest association with prediabetes. The findings suggest that there are some differences between men and women, which should be taken into account when implementing specific recommendations to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in adult population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 194 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 1%
Unknown 192 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 33 17%
Researcher 27 14%
Student > Bachelor 26 13%
Student > Postgraduate 17 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 9%
Other 42 22%
Unknown 32 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 88 45%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 4%
Social Sciences 7 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Other 23 12%
Unknown 39 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2020.
All research outputs
#2,010,178
of 17,986,329 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#263
of 1,747 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,462
of 298,419 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,986,329 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,747 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,419 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them