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The impact of a private sector living wage intervention on consumption and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a middle income country

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of a private sector living wage intervention on consumption and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a middle income country
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5052-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

David H. Rehkopf, Katharine Burmaster, John C. Landefeld, Sarah Adler-Milstein, Emily P. Flynn, Maria Cecilia Acevedo, Jessica C. Jones-Smith, Nancy Adler, Lia C. H. Fernald

Abstract

A positive association of socioeconomic position and health is well established in high-income countries. In poorer nations, however, higher income individuals often have more cardiovascular risk factors (including obesity) than do those with less income. Our study goal was to estimate the effects of receiving a living wage (340% higher income) on short-term changes in consumption and cardiovascular risk factors among low-wage workers in a middle-income country. This cross-sectional study matched workers at an apparel factory (n=105) in the Dominican Republic with those at a similar factory (n=99) nearby, 15 months after the intervention factory introduced a substantially higher living wage. Statistical matching on non-time varying individual characteristics (childhood health, childhood living conditions, work experience, demographic factors) strengthened causal inference. Primary outcomes were blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), pulse rate, body mass index and waist circumference. Secondary outcomes were dietary consumption and spending on services, consumables and durable goods. Receiving the living wage was associated with increased consumption of protein, dairy, soda and juice and sugars, but not with cardiovascular risk factors. Intervention factory workers spent more on grocery items and household durable goods. While having a higher income in a middle-income country might be expected to increase obesity and its associated health risks, the current study found no short-term negative associations. There may be possible longer-term negative health consequences of increases in consumption of soda, juice and sugars, however. It is important to consider complementary interventions to support healthy dietary intake in areas with increasing wages.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 17%
Student > Master 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 8%
Researcher 4 8%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 17 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 7 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 9%
Engineering 3 6%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 22 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 63. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2020.
All research outputs
#462,591
of 19,417,097 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#422
of 12,766 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,059
of 387,932 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,417,097 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,766 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 387,932 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them