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Hybrid blade and locking plate fixation for proximal humerus fractures: a comparative biomechanical analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BioMedical Engineering OnLine, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Hybrid blade and locking plate fixation for proximal humerus fractures: a comparative biomechanical analysis
Published in
BioMedical Engineering OnLine, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12938-018-0447-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ali Jabran, Chris Peach, Zhenmin Zou, Lei Ren

Abstract

Open reduction and internal fixation of proximal humerus fractures can be difficult to achieve adequate, complication free results due to osteopenia of the proximal humerus and unstable fracture patterns. This study aimed to compare the biomechanical properties of a novel hybrid fixed angle blade plate (Fx plate) with an established fixed angle locking plate (PHILOS plate). A two-part fracture was simulated in synthetic composite humeri by creating a transverse osteotomy and 10 mm fracture gap at the surgical neck. After treating the fractures with either an Fx plate or a PHILOS plate, humeral head was fixed and the shaft was displaced in a cantilever fashion. For elastic tests, loading was along the frontal and sagittal plane to achieve varus/valgus and extension/flexion, respectively. In plastic tests, loading was in a varus direction to determine the constructs' resistance to varus collapse. In elastic tests, both construct types had higher peak load and stiffness in extension/flexion than varus/valgus. Fx plate constructs were significantly stiffer than PHILOS constructs in varus/valgus (mean: 7.590/6.900 vs. 6.609/6.091 N/mm; p < 0.001 for both) but significantly less stiff in extension/flexion (8.770/9.541 vs. 9.533/9.997 N/mm; p < 0.001 for extension, p < 0.05 for flexion). In varus plastic tests, significantly higher peak loads were reported for Fx plate than PHILOS (134.391 vs. 115.531 N; p < 0.001). In this fracture gap model, humeri implanted with a novel Fx plate provided higher varus/valgus stiffness but lower extension/flexion stiffness than a more traditional proximal humeral locking plate design (PHILOS).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Master 3 8%
Lecturer 2 5%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 10 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 30%
Engineering 9 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Materials Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 11 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2018.
All research outputs
#6,407,363
of 12,639,455 outputs
Outputs from BioMedical Engineering OnLine
#169
of 560 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,989
of 344,212 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BioMedical Engineering OnLine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,639,455 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 560 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,212 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them