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Assessing the feasibility of integration of self-care for filarial lymphoedema into existing community leprosy self-help groups in Nepal

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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96 Mendeley
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Title
Assessing the feasibility of integration of self-care for filarial lymphoedema into existing community leprosy self-help groups in Nepal
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5099-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph Pryce, Hayley E. Mableson, Ramesh Choudhary, Basu Dev Pandey, Dambar Aley, Hannah Betts, Charles D. Mackenzie, Louise A. Kelly-Hope, Hugh Cross

Abstract

Lymphatic filariasis (LF) and leprosy are disabling infectious diseases endemic in Nepal. LF infection can lead to lymphoedema and hydrocoele, while secondary effects of leprosy infection include impairments to hands, eyes and feet. The disabling effects of both conditions can be managed through self-care and the supportive effects of self-help groups (SHGs). A network of SHGs exists for people affected by leprosy in four districts in Nepal's Central Development Region, however no such service exists for people affected by LF. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of integrating LF affected people into existing leprosy SHGs in this area. A survey was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire to elicit information on: (i) participant characteristics, clinical manifestation and disease burden; (ii) participants' knowledge of management of their condition and access to services; and (iii) participants' knowledge and perceptions of the alternate condition (LF affected participants' knowledge of leprosy and vice versa) and attitudes towards integration. A total of 52 LF affected and 53 leprosy affected participants were interviewed from 14 SHGs. On average, leprosy affected participants were shown to have 1.8 times greater knowledge of self-care techniques, and practiced 2.5 times more frequently than LF affected participants. Only a quarter of LF affected participants had accessed a health service for their condition, compared with 94.3% of leprosy affected people accessing a service (including SHGs), at least once a week. High levels of stigma were perceived by both groups towards the alternate condition, however, the majority of LF (79%) and leprosy (94.3%) affected participants stated that they would consider attending an integrated SHG. LF affected participants need to increase their knowledge of self-care and access to health services. Despite stigma being a potential barrier, attitudes towards integration were positive, suggesting that the SHGs may be a good platform for LF affected people to start self-care in this area. This is not a registered trial.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 96 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 24%
Student > Master 13 14%
Other 9 9%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 24 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Neuroscience 4 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 4%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 29 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,825,552
of 16,294,946 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,162
of 11,193 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,219
of 370,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,294,946 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,193 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 370,625 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them