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Don't worry, be happy: cross-sectional associations between physical activity and happiness in 15 European countries

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

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310 Mendeley
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Title
Don't worry, be happy: cross-sectional associations between physical activity and happiness in 15 European countries
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1391-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Justin Richards, Xiaoxiao Jiang, Paul Kelly, Josephine Chau, Adrian Bauman, Ding

Abstract

BackgroundMental health disorders are major contributors to the global burden of disease and their inverse relationship with physical activity is widely accepted. However, research on the association between physical activity and positive mental health outcomes is limited. Happiness is an example of a positive construct of mental health that may be promoted by physical activity and could increase resilience to emotional perturbations. The aim of this study is to use a large multi-country dataset to assess the association of happiness with physical activity volume and its specificity to intensity and/or activity domain.MethodsWe analysed Eurobarometer 2002 data from 15 countries (n¿=¿11,637). This comprised one question assessing self-reported happiness on a six point scale (dichotomised: happy/unhappy) and physical activity data collected using the IPAQ-short (i.e. walking, moderate, vigorous) and four domain specific items (i.e. domestic, leisure, transport, vocation). Logistic regression was used to examine the association between happiness and physical activity volume adjusted for sex, age, country, general health, relationship status, employment and education. Analyses of intensity and domain specificity were assessed by logistic regression adjusted for the same covariates and physical activity volume.ResultsWhen compared to inactive people, there was a positive dose¿response association between physical activity volume and happiness (highly active: OR¿=¿1.52 [1.28-1.80]; sufficiently active: OR¿=¿1.29 [1.11-1.49]; insufficiently active: OR¿=¿1.20 [1.03-1.39]). There were small positive associations with happiness for walking (OR¿=¿1.02 [1.00-1.03]) and vigorous-intensity physical activity (OR¿=¿1.03 [1.01-1.05). Moderate-intensity physical activity was not associated with happiness (OR¿=¿1.01 [0.99-1.03]). The strongest domain specific associations with happiness were found for ¿a lot¿ of domestic (OR¿=¿1.42 [1.20-1.68]) and ¿some¿ vocational (OR¿=¿1.33 [1.08-1.64]) physical activity. Happiness was also associated with ¿a lot¿ of leisure physical activity (OR¿=¿1.15 [1.02-1.30]), but there were no significant associations for the transport domain.ConclusionsIncreasing physical activity volume was associated with higher levels of happiness. Although the influence of physical activity intensity appeared minimal, the association with happiness was domain specific and was strongest for ¿a lot¿ of domestic and/or ¿some¿ vocational physical activity. Future studies to establish causation are indicated and may prompt changes in how physical activity for improving mental health is promoted.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 310 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
Unknown 301 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 57 18%
Student > Master 46 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 13%
Researcher 28 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 24 8%
Other 45 15%
Unknown 70 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 58 19%
Sports and Recreations 49 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 13%
Social Sciences 23 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 5%
Other 39 13%
Unknown 85 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 267. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2021.
All research outputs
#104,270
of 22,053,897 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#90
of 14,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,323
of 325,122 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,053,897 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,299 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 325,122 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them