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Equine dietary supplements: an insight into their use and perceptions in the Irish equine industry

Overview of attention for article published in Irish Veterinary Journal, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#39 of 147)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Equine dietary supplements: an insight into their use and perceptions in the Irish equine industry
Published in
Irish Veterinary Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13620-018-0115-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. M. D. Murray, E. Hanna, P. Hastie

Abstract

Nutritional supplements are frequently used by horse owners/caregivers to supplement their horse(s) diets. Some work has been done to identify the types of supplements fed and the reasons for doing so; however, this has been predominantly disciple-specific and with little focus on participants' perceptions of supplement testing and regulation. The aim of this study was to gain an insight into the use and perceptions of equine dietary supplements in the Irish equestrian industry. An online survey was designed to ascertain the following information: demographics, types of supplements fed and reasons for use, factors that influenced respondents' choice of supplement, where advice was sought and perceptions of testing and regulation of equine supplements. The survey yielded 134 responses, 70% non-professionals and 30% professionals. A greater percentage of professionals included supplements in their horse(s) diets (98%) compared to non-professionals (86%). Almost 70% of professionals fed more than two supplements, whereas 80% of non-professionals reported to feed only one supplement. Joint supplements were most commonly fed by all respondents (22%) followed by calming supplements (13%). The enhancement of performance (35%) and prevention of joint disorders (34%) were the most common reasons reported by respondents for using a supplement. Over 53% of respondents sought advice on choosing a supplement from their feed merchant, followed by their veterinarian (46%). Veterinary recommendation was given as the most influential factor when choosing a supplement by 90% of respondents, followed by cost (69%). Most (93%) respondents thought that feed supplements had to meet legal standards, with each batch analysed for quality (72%) and the supplement tested on horses before being launched on to the market (92%). This study has identified the main types of supplements used in the Irish equestrian industry along with the reasons for their use. However, it has also highlighted major misperceptions in how supplements are tested before being launched for sale and further work on this aspect of the findings would be beneficial.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 30%
Student > Master 10 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Researcher 2 4%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 12 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 16 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 28%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 16 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2018.
All research outputs
#6,495,429
of 12,498,628 outputs
Outputs from Irish Veterinary Journal
#39
of 147 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,280
of 341,227 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Irish Veterinary Journal
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,498,628 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 147 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,227 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them