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Cross-sectional survey of knowledge of obstetric danger signs among women in rural Madagascar

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, February 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
171 Mendeley
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Title
Cross-sectional survey of knowledge of obstetric danger signs among women in rural Madagascar
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12884-018-1664-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ania Salem, Oriane Lacour, Stefano Scaringella, Josea Herinianasolo, Anne Caroline Benski, Giovanna Stancanelli, Pierre Vassilakos, Patrick Petignat, Nicole Christine Schmidt

Abstract

Antenatal care (ANC) has the potential to identify and manage obstetric complications, educate women about risks during pregnancy and promote skilled birth attendance during childbirth. The aim of this study was to assess women's knowledge of obstetric danger signs and factors associated with this knowledge in Ambanja, Madagascar. It also sought to evaluate whether the participation in a mobile health (mHealth) project that aimed to provide comprehensive ANC to pregnant women in remote areas influenced women's knowledge of obstetric danger signs. From April to October 2015, a non-random, convenience sample of 372 women in their first year postpartum were recruited, including 161 who had participated in the mHealth project. Data were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Knowledge of at least one danger sign varied from 80.9% of women knowing danger sign(s) in pregnancy, to 51.9%, 50.8% and 53.2% at delivery, postpartum and in the newborn, respectively. Participation in the mHealth intervention, higher household income, and receipt of information about danger signs during pregnancy were associated with knowledge of danger signs during delivery, in bivariate analysis; only higher household income and mHealth project participation were independently associated. Higher educational attainment and receipt of information about danger signs in antenatal care were associated with significantly higher odds of knowing danger sign(s) for the newborn in both bivariate and multivariate analysis. Knowledge of obstetric danger signs is low. Information provision during pregnancy and with mHealth is promising. This trial was retrospectively registered at the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Register (identifier ISRCTN15798183 ; August 22, 2015).

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 171 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 171 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 21%
Student > Bachelor 31 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 9%
Researcher 12 7%
Student > Postgraduate 9 5%
Other 25 15%
Unknown 43 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 49 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 23%
Social Sciences 5 3%
Computer Science 5 3%
Engineering 5 3%
Other 18 11%
Unknown 50 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2018.
All research outputs
#2,833,619
of 12,465,602 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#770
of 2,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,681
of 339,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,465,602 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,277 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,495 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them