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Clinical results of proton beam therapy for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Radiation Oncology, February 2018
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Title
Clinical results of proton beam therapy for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer
Published in
Radiation Oncology, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13014-018-0967-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takashi Ono, Tatsuya Nakamura, Hisashi Yamaguchi, Yusuke Azami, Kanako Takayama, Motohisa Suzuki, Hitoshi Wada, Yasuhiro Kikuchi, Masao Murakami, Kenji Nemoto

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of proton beam therapy for elderly patients (≥80 years of age) with non-small cell lung cancer. Patients diagnosed with T1-4 N0 M0 non-small cell lung cancer and treated with proton beam therapy between January 2009 and 2015 were recruited from our database retrospectively. Toxicity was evaluated using The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Thirty-five patients, including 25 (71%) with clinically inoperable lung cancer, were administered proton beam therapy. The median age was 82 years (range: 80-87 years), and the median follow-up time was 34 months (range: 10-72 months). The median dose of proton beam therapy was 80.0 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) (range: 60.0-80.0 Gy [RBE]), and all patients completed the treatments. All patients were followed for at least 23 months or until their death. The 3-year overall survival rate was 67.2% (90.0% in patients with operable lung cancer, and 58.2% in those with inoperable lung cancer). The 3-year local control rate was 86.5%. Two patients presented with grade 2 pneumonitis. The occurrence rate of grade 2 pneumonitis was significantly correlated with a high lung V20 (p = 0.030), and a high mean lung dose (p = 0.030), and a low ratio of lung volume spared from 0.05 Gy (RBE) dose (total lung volume minus lung volume irradiated at least 0.05 Gy [RBE]) (p = 0.030). However, there were no cases of grade 3 or higher radiation pneumonitis. This study suggests that the proton beam therapy was feasible for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer and can be considered as one of the treatment choices for elderly patients with lung cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 19%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 8 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Physics and Astronomy 1 5%
Engineering 1 5%
Unknown 9 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2018.
All research outputs
#12,721,373
of 16,669,654 outputs
Outputs from Radiation Oncology
#1,073
of 1,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#248,959
of 370,948 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Radiation Oncology
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,676 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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