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The usefulness of bone SPECT/CT imaging with volume of interest analysis in early axial spondyloarthritis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, February 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
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Title
The usefulness of bone SPECT/CT imaging with volume of interest analysis in early axial spondyloarthritis
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12891-015-0465-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yong-il Kim, Minseok Suh, Yu Kyeong Kim, Ho-Young Lee, Kichul Shin

Abstract

BackgroundThe role of conventional bone scintigraphy in diagnosing early axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) is yet controversial. Single positron emission computed tomography (SPECT) plus CT is an imaging modality that adds better anatomical information to scintigraphy of the sacroiliac (SI) joint. Our aim was to investigate the usefulness of bone SPECT/CT with volume of interest (VOI) analysis in early axial SpA patients.MethodsTwenty patients (male: female ratio¿=¿12:8; age range¿=¿17¿65 years) presenting with inflammatory back pain meeting the Amor criteria of early axial SpA were recruited from a single center in South Korea. Bone scintigraphy was performed 180 min after intravenous injection of 1110 MBq of Tc-99 m-HDP, followed by bone SPECT/CT. The ratio between the entire SI joint and sacrum (SIS ratio) was measured by both bone SPECT/CT and bone scintigraphy. Data from 13 controls were also evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted for further analysis, and the correlation between the SIS ratio and SI joint grade by plain radiography was assessed.ResultsThe SIS ratio of early axial SpA patients vs. control subjects was significantly increased in bone SPECT/CT (p¿<¿0.001). However, no significant difference was detected in bone scintigraphy. ROC curve analysis showed a significant difference in the area under curve (AUC) of bone SPECT/CT vs. bone scintigraphy (0.862 vs. 0.523, respectively; p¿<¿0.001). With a cut-off SIS ratio of 1.50, ROC curve analysis showed a sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 84.6% in bone SPECT/CT. The SIS ratio measured in SPECT/CT, but not that measured in bone scintigraphy, was significantly increased with a higher grade of SI joint changes in plain radiography (p¿=¿0.014).ConclusionBone SPECT/CT is more useful than conventional bone scintigraphy in identifying sacroiliitis in early axial SpA patients, even with mild SI joint changes in plain radiography. By combining CT, we can accurately delineate the sacrum and SI joint uptake with our VOI method.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Tunisia 1 3%
Egypt 1 3%
Unknown 35 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 16%
Other 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Lecturer 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 9 24%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Psychology 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 10 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2015.
All research outputs
#2,233,688
of 5,036,026 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#790
of 1,695 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,060
of 178,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#22
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,036,026 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,695 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 178,999 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.