↓ Skip to main content

Effect of gelatin-polysuccinat on cerebral oxygenation and microcirculation in a porcine haemorrhagic shock model

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, February 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Effect of gelatin-polysuccinat on cerebral oxygenation and microcirculation in a porcine haemorrhagic shock model
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13049-018-0477-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander Ziebart, Christian Möllmann, Andreas Garcia-Bardon, Jens Kamuf, Moritz Schäfer, Rainer Thomas, Erik K. Hartmann

Abstract

During early treatment of haemorrhagic shock maintenance of cerebral and end-organ oxygen supply by fluid resuscitation is mandatory. Gelatin-polysuccinat (GP) recently regained attention despite a still unclear risk profile and widely unknown effects on cerebral and peripheral microcirculation. This study investigates the effects of GP versus balanced electrolyte solution (BEL) with focus on cerebral regional oxygen saturation and peripheral microcirculation in a porcine haemorrhagic shock model. After Animal Care Committee approval haemorrhagic shock was induced by arterial blood withdrawal in 27 anaesthetized pigs. Consequently, the animals received rapid fluid resuscitation by either GP or BEL to replace the removed amount of blood, or remained untreated (n = 3 × 9). Over two hours cerebral regional oxygen saturation by near-infrared spectroscopy and peripheral buccal microcirculation by combined white-light spectrometry and laser-Doppler flowmetry were recorded. Secondary parameters included extended haemodynamics, spirometry, haematological and blood gas parameters. Both fluid resuscitation regimes sufficiently stabilized the macro- and microcirculation in haemorrhagic shock with a more pronounced effect following GP infusion. GP administration led to a persisting, critical impairment of cerebral regional oxygen saturation through considerable haemodilution. Survival rates were 100% in both fluid resuscitation groups, but only 33% in the untreated control. Equal amounts of GP and BEL sufficiently stabilize systemic circulation and microcirculatory perfusion. Forced fluid resuscitation by GP should be applied with caution to prevent haemodilution-induced impairment of cerebral oxygen delivery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 33%
Other 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Lecturer 2 10%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 48%
Engineering 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 5%
Unknown 5 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2018.
All research outputs
#10,003,668
of 12,498,628 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#695
of 784 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#249,844
of 344,704 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,498,628 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 784 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,704 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them