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Costing the supply chain for delivery of ACT and RDTs in the public sector in Benin and Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2015
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Title
Costing the supply chain for delivery of ACT and RDTs in the public sector in Benin and Kenya
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-014-0530-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rima Shretta, Brittany Johnson, Lisa Smith, Seydou Doumbia, Don de Savigny, Ravi Anupindi, Prashant Yadav

Abstract

BackgroundStudies have shown that supply chain costs are a significant proportion of total programme costs. Nevertheless, the costs of delivering specific products are poorly understood and ballpark estimates are often used to inadequately plan for the budgetary implications of supply chain expenses. The purpose of this research was to estimate the country level costs of the public sector supply chain for artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) from the central to the peripheral levels in Benin and Kenya.MethodsA micro-costing approach was used and primary data on the various cost components of the supply chain was collected at the central, intermediate, and facility levels between September and November 2013. Information sources included central warehouse databases, health facility records, transport schedules, and expenditure reports. Data from document reviews and semi-structured interviews were used to identify cost inputs and estimate actual costs. Sampling was purposive to isolate key variables of interest. Survey guides were developed and administered electronically. Data were extracted into Microsoft Excel®, and the supply chain cost per unit of ACT and RDT distributed by function and level of system was calculated.ResultsIn Benin, supply chain costs added USD 0.2011 to the initial acquisition cost of ACT and USD 0.3375 to RDTs (normalized to USD 1). In Kenya, they added USD 0.2443 to the acquisition cost of ACT and USD 0.1895 to RDTs (normalized to USD 1). Total supply chain costs accounted for more than 30% of the initial acquisition cost of the products in some cases and these costs were highly sensitive to product volumes. The major cost drivers were found to be labour, transport, and utilities with health facilities carrying the majority of the cost per unit of product.ConclusionsAccurate cost estimates are needed to ensure adequate resources are available for supply chain activities. Product volumes should be considered when costing supply chain functions rather than dollar value. Further work is needed to develop extrapolative costing models that can be applied at country level without extensive micro-costing exercises. This will allow other countries to generate more accurate estimates in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Colombia 1 1%
Unknown 85 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 22%
Researcher 18 21%
Student > Postgraduate 9 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 15 17%
Unknown 14 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Business, Management and Accounting 16 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 14%
Social Sciences 11 13%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 7 8%
Engineering 7 8%
Other 20 23%
Unknown 14 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2015.
All research outputs
#12,427,574
of 18,904,345 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#3,970
of 5,022 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170,743
of 304,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,904,345 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,022 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 304,550 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them