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Informing the development of online weight management interventions: a qualitative investigation of primary care patient perceptions

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Informing the development of online weight management interventions: a qualitative investigation of primary care patient perceptions
Published in
BMC Obesity, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40608-018-0184-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samantha B. van Beurden, Sally I. Simmons, Jason C. H. Tang, Avril J. Mewse, Charles Abraham, Colin J. Greaves

Abstract

The internet is a potentially promising medium for delivering weight loss interventions. The current study sought to explore factors that might influence primary care patients' initial uptake and continued use (up to four-weeks) of such programmes to help inform the development of novel, or refinement of existing, weight management interventions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 patients purposively sampled based on age, gender and BMI from a single rural general practice. The interviews were conducted 4 weeks after recruitment at the general practice and focused on experiences with using one of three freely available weight loss websites. Thematic Analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings suggested that patients were initially motivated to engage with internet-based weight loss programmes by their accessibility and novelty. However, continued use was influenced by substantial facilitators and barriers, such as time and effort involved, reaction to prompts/reminders, and usefulness of information. Facilitation by face-to-face consultations with the GP was reported to be helpful in supporting change. Although primary care patients may not be ready yet to solely depend on online interventions for weight loss, their willingness to use them shows potential for use alongside face-to-face weight management advice or intervention. Recommendations to minimise barriers to engagement are provided.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 29%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Other 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 15%
Social Sciences 7 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 15%
Computer Science 3 6%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2018.
All research outputs
#3,603,147
of 12,749,777 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#79
of 176 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,012
of 347,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,749,777 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 176 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,923 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them