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Biomechanical effects of metastasis in the osteoporotic lumbar spine: A Finite Element Analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, February 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

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10 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Biomechanical effects of metastasis in the osteoporotic lumbar spine: A Finite Element Analysis
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12891-018-1953-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giuseppe Salvatore, Alessandra Berton, Hugo Giambini, Mauro Ciuffreda, Pino Florio, Umile Giuseppe Longo, Vincenzo Denaro, Andrew Thoreson, Kai-Nan An

Abstract

Cancer patients are likely to undergo osteoporosis as consequence of hormone manipulation and/or chemotherapy. Little is known about possible increased risk of fracture in this population. The aim of this study was to describe the biomechanical effect of a metastatic lesion in an osteoporotic lumbar spine model. A finite element model of two spinal motion segments (L3-L5) was extracted from a previously developed L3-Sacrum model and used to analyze the effect of metastasis size and bone mineral density (BMD) on Vertebral bulge (VB) and Vertebral height (VH). VB and VH represent respectively radial and axial displacement and they have been correlated to burst fracture. A total of 6 scenarios were evaluated combining three metastasis sizes (no metastasis, 15% and 30% of the vertebral body) and two BMD conditions (normal BMD and osteoporosis). 15% metastasis increased VB and VH by 178% and 248%, respectively in normal BMD model; while VB and VH increased by 134% and 174% in osteoporotic model. 30% metastasis increased VB and VH by 88% and 109%, respectively, when compared to 15% metastasis in normal BMD model; while VB and VH increased by 59% and 74% in osteoporotic model. A metastasis in the osteoporotic lumbar spine always leads to a higher risk of vertebral fracture. This risk increases with the size of the metastasis. Unexpectedly, an increment in metastasis size in the normal BMD spine produces a greater impact on vertebral stability compared to the osteoporotic spine.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 29%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 21 51%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 7 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2018.
All research outputs
#3,026,153
of 15,922,425 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#655
of 3,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,785
of 371,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,425 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,079 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,600 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them