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Defining the normal appearance of the temporomandibular joints by magnetic resonance imaging with contrast: a comparative study of children with and without juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatric Rheumatology, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
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Title
Defining the normal appearance of the temporomandibular joints by magnetic resonance imaging with contrast: a comparative study of children with and without juvenile idiopathic arthritis
Published in
Pediatric Rheumatology, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12969-018-0223-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew L. Stoll, Saurabh Guleria, Melissa L. Mannion, Daniel W. Young, Stuart A. Royal, Randy Q. Cron, Yoginder N. Vaid

Abstract

Up to 80% of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) develop arthritis involving their temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Recent studies have questioned the sensitivity of an abnormal MRI in the diagnosis of active arthritis. 122 children without arthritis undergoing contrast MRI of the head were prospectively consented to undergo a simultaneous contrast MRI of their TMJs. As a comparison point, the initial MRI of the TMJ of 35 newly diagnosed children with JIA were retrospectively scored. The presence and size of effusion and contrast enhancement were measured in the left TMJ in all subjects. 62/122 (51%) controls compared to only 10/35 JIA (29%) patients had an effusion (p = 0.022). Contrast enhancement was present in ≥97% of both groups, although the size of the enhancement was, on average, 0.2 mm larger in controls (1.1 ± 0.24 vs 0.88 ± 0.27 mm, p <  0.001). Among JIA patients, the size of the enhancement correlated inversely with disease duration (r = - 0.475, p = 0.005). Chronic changes were present in none of the controls versus 2/35 (5.5%) of the JIA patients (p = 0.049). Findings consistent with minimally active TMJ arthritis appear to be equally likely in children with JIA as compared to non-inflamed controls, while this and other studies confirm that chronic changes are specific to JIA. Thus, small amounts of effusion or contrast enhancement, in the absence of chronic changes, should be interpreted with caution.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 9 24%
Unknown 10 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 54%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Materials Science 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 13 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 January 2021.
All research outputs
#6,455,874
of 19,898,358 outputs
Outputs from Pediatric Rheumatology
#236
of 617 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#163,746
of 444,661 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatric Rheumatology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,898,358 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 617 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 444,661 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them