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Why do endocrine profiles in elite athletes differ between sports?

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology, February 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

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11 news outlets
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2 blogs
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68 tweeters
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1 video uploader

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Title
Why do endocrine profiles in elite athletes differ between sports?
Published in
Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40842-017-0050-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter H. Sönksen, Richard I. G. Holt, Walailuck Böhning, Nishan Guha, David A. Cowan, Christiaan Bartlett, Dankmar Böhning

Abstract

Endocrine profiles have been measured on blood samples obtained immediately post-competition from 693 elite athletes from 15 Olympic Sports competing at National or International level; four were subsequently excluded leaving 689 for the current analysis. Body composition was measured by bioimpedance in a sub-set of 234 (146 men and 88 women) and from these data a regression model was constructed that enabled 'estimated' lean body mass and fat mass to be calculated on all athletes. One way ANOVA was used to assess the differences in body composition and endocrine profiles between the sports and binary logistical regression to ascertain the characteristic of a given sport compared to the others. The results confirmed many suppositions such as basketball players being tall, weightlifters short and cross-country skiers light. The hormone profiles were more surprising with remarkably low testosterone and free T3 (tri-iodothyronine) in male powerlifters and high oestradiol, SHBG (sex hormone binding globulin) and prolactin in male track and field athletes. Low testosterone concentrations were seen 25.4% of male elite competitors in 12 of the 15 sports and high testosterone concentrations in 4.8% of female elite athletes in 3 of the 8 sports tested. Interpretation of the results is more difficult; some of the differences between sports are at least partially due to differences in age of the athletes but the apparent differences between sports remain significant after adjusting for age. The prevalence of 'hyperandrogenism' (as defined by the IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federations) and IOC (International Olympic Committee)) amongst this cohort of 231 elite female athletes was the highest so far recorded and the very high prevalence of 'hypoandrogenism' in elite male athletes a new finding. It is unclear whether the differences in hormone profiles between sports is a reason why they become elite athletes in that sport or is a consequence of the arduous processes involved. For components of body composition we know that most have a major genetic component and this may well be true for endocrine profiles.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 68 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 18%
Researcher 8 18%
Student > Master 6 13%
Other 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 12 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 13 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 18%
Arts and Humanities 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 12 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 157. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 December 2021.
All research outputs
#174,553
of 20,106,890 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology
#2
of 71 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,056
of 293,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,106,890 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 71 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,393 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them