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Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies and high levels of rheumatoid factor are associated with systemic bone loss in patients with early untreated rheumatoid arthritis

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, October 2016
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Title
Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies and high levels of rheumatoid factor are associated with systemic bone loss in patients with early untreated rheumatoid arthritis
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13075-016-1116-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Serena Bugatti, Laura Bogliolo, Barbara Vitolo, Antonio Manzo, Carlomaurizio Montecucco, Roberto Caporali

Abstract

Autoantibodies such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) are major risk factors for articular bone destruction from the earliest phases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the current study was to determine whether RA-associated autoantibodies also impact on systemic bone loss in patients with early disease. Systemic bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in the lumbar spine and the hip in 155 consecutive treatment-naïve patients with early RA (median symptom duration 13 weeks). Demographic and disease-specific parameters, including clinical disease activity, ultrasonographic (US) examination of the hands and wrists, radiographic scoring of joint damage, ACPA and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were recorded from all patients. Reduced BMD was defined as Z score ≤ -1 SD and analysed in relation to disease-related characteristics and autoantibody subgroups. Reduced BMD was found in 25.5 % of the patients in the spine and 19.4 % in the hip. Symptom duration, clinical and US disease activity, functional disability and radiographic damage did not significantly impact on spine and hip BMD loss in regression analyses adjusted for possible confounders (age, gender, menopausal status, current smoking, body mass index). In contrast, ACPA positivity (at any level) negatively affected the spine Z-score (adjusted OR (95 % CI) 2.76 (1.19 to 6.42)); the hip Z score was affected by high titres only (adjusted OR (95 % CI) 2.96 (1.15 to 7.66)). The association of ACPA with reduced BMD in the spine was confirmed even at low levels of RF (adjusted OR (95 % CI) 2.65 (1.01 to 7.24)), but was further increased by concomitant high RF (adjusted OR (95 % CI) 3.38 (1.11 to 10.34)). In contrast, Z scores in the hip were significantly reduced only in association with high ACPA and RF (adjusted OR (95 % CI) 4.96 (1.48 to 16.64)). Systemic BMD in patients with early RA is reduced in relation with ACPA positivity and high RF levels. This finding supports the notion that RA-associated autoimmunity may have a direct causative role in bone remodeling.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 62 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 20%
Researcher 11 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 15 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 16 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2018.
All research outputs
#11,775,956
of 19,820,231 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,758
of 2,748 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,458
of 288,978 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,820,231 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,748 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,978 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them