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Surgical resection for clinical stage I high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Surgical Oncology, February 2018
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Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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9 Mendeley
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Title
Surgical resection for clinical stage I high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung
Published in
World Journal of Surgical Oncology, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12957-018-1337-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eisuke Mochizuki, Shun Matsuura, Kyohei Oishi, Koichi Miyashita, Koshiro Ichijyo, Syunya Furukawa, Miyuki Nagaoka, Shinichiro Mikura, Masaru Tsukui, Naoki Koshimizu, Shogo Sakurai, Kazuhiro Asada, Toshihiro Shirai

Abstract

There are few reports about the factor influencing the prognosis of high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated surgical outcome of clinical stage I high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma. Patients who underwent curative surgery for high-grade neuroendocrine tumors of the lung in clinical stage I were included in this study. We retrospectively analyzed 27 consecutive patients. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical course of the disease after surgery and what factors influence the prognosis. Twenty-two patients have small cell carcinoma, and 5 patients have large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Patients who could undergo surgery within 60 days after the first visit (p < 0.01) and undergo lobectomy (p < 0.01) and whose pro-gastrin-releasing peptide ≦ 72 pg/ml (p = 0.04) performed good prognosis after surgery. In multivariate analysis, surgery within 60 days and operative procedure were independent factors associated with OS. Surgical resection for clinical stage I high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung should be performed as early as possible, and better outcome can be obtained with lobectomy than partial resection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 2 22%
Other 1 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Student > Master 1 11%
Researcher 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 11%
Unknown 3 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,859,936
of 12,526,930 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#381
of 1,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,305
of 270,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#6
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,526,930 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,345 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,946 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.