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Phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in the Greek Aegean Islands: ecological approaches

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, February 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in the Greek Aegean Islands: ecological approaches
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13071-018-2680-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nikolaos Tsirigotakis, Christoforos Pavlou, Vasiliki Christodoulou, Emmanouil Dokianakis, Christos Kourouniotis, Bulent Alten, Maria Antoniou

Abstract

Blood-sucking phlebotomine sand flies are the vectors of the protozoan parasites Leishmania spp. Different Phlebotomus species transmit different Leishmania species causing leishmaniases which are neglected diseases emerging/reemerging in new regions. Thirteen sand fly species, ten belonging to the medically important genus Phlebotomus and three belonging to Sergentomyia are known in Greece. An increasing number of human and dog cases are reported each year from all parts of the country including the Aegean Islands. However, no previous study has been conducted on the sand fly fauna on the islands, except for Rhodes and Samos. The aim of this study was to investigate sand fly species in eleven small Aegean islands; to understand species-specific relationships with environmental and climatic factors and to compare sand fly community parameters among islands. A risk analysis was carried out for each species using climatic and environmental variables. Nine sand fly species: Phlebotomus neglectus, P. tobbi, P. similis, P. simici, P. perfiliewi, P. alexandri, P. papatasi, Sergentomyia minuta and S. dentata, were collected from the islands studied. Phlebotomus (Adlerius) sp. and Sergentomyia sp. specimens were also collected but not identified to the species level. There was a positive effect of distance from the sea on the abundance of P. neglectus, S. minuta and S. dentata, and a negative effect on the abundance of P. tobbi, P. simici and P. similis. In general, temperature preferences of sand fly populations were between 21 and 29 °C. Nevertheless, there were significant differences in terms of temperature and relative humidity preference ranges among species. The most important species found, P. neglectus, was indisputably the most adapted species in the study area with a very high reaction norm, favoring even the lower temperature and humidity ranges. Overall, the sand fly fauna in the islands was very rich but there were differences in species diversity, as indicated by the values of the Shannon-Wiener index, along with evenness and richness of the sand fly fauna between the islands and altitude ranges in the islands. The study indicated that the Greek Aegean Islands, however small, maintain a rich sand fly fauna. This includes important vectors of Leishmania spp. representing a risk for parasite transmission to humans and dogs along with the danger of maintaining new Leishmania spp. if introduced to the area.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 30%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Master 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2018.
All research outputs
#4,010,130
of 13,958,558 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#942
of 3,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,140
of 273,905 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,958,558 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,745 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,905 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them