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The transcriptome response of the ruminal methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium strain M1 to the inhibitor lauric acid

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, February 2018
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Title
The transcriptome response of the ruminal methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium strain M1 to the inhibitor lauric acid
Published in
BMC Research Notes, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3242-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xuan Zhou, Marc J. A. Stevens, Stefan Neuenschwander, Angela Schwarm, Michael Kreuzer, Anna Bratus-Neuenschwander, Johanna O. Zeitz

Abstract

Lauric acid (C12) is a medium-chain fatty acid that inhibits growth and production of the greenhouse gas methane by rumen methanogens such as Methanobrevibacter ruminantium. To understand the inhibitory mechanism of C12, a transcriptome analysis was performed in M. ruminantium strain M1 (DSM 1093) using RNA-Seq. Pure cell cultures in the exponential growth phase were treated with 0.4 mg/ml C12, dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), for 1 h and transcriptomic changes were compared to DMSO-only treated cells (final DMSO concentration 0.2%). Exposure to C12resulted in differential expression of 163 of the 2280 genes in the M1 genome (maximum log2-fold change 6.6). Remarkably, C12hardly affected the expression of genes involved in methanogenesis. Instead, most affected genes encode cell-surface associated proteins (adhesion-like proteins, membrane-associated transporters and hydrogenases), and proteins involved in detoxification or DNA-repair processes. Enrichment analysis on the genes regulated in the C12-treated group showed a significant enrichment for categories 'cell surface' and 'mobile elements' (activated by C12), and for the categories 'regulation' and 'protein fate' (represssed). These results are useful to generate and test specific hypotheses on the mechanism how C12affects rumen methanogens.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 19%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 4 19%
Unknown 6 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 14%
Chemical Engineering 2 10%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 5 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2018.
All research outputs
#10,647,130
of 16,638,522 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,837
of 3,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,811
of 280,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,638,522 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,590 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,500 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them