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Marginal socio-economic effects of an employer’s efforts to improve the work environment

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 128)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
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Title
Marginal socio-economic effects of an employer’s efforts to improve the work environment
Published in
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40557-018-0212-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mahmoud Rezagholi

Abstract

Workplace health promotion (WHP) strongly requires the employer's efforts to improve the psychosocial, ergonomic, and physical environments of the workplace. There are many studies discussing the socio-economic advantage of WHP intervention programmes and thus the internal and external factors motivating employers to implement and integrate such programmes. However, the socio-economic impacts of the employer's multifactorial efforts to improve the work environment need to be adequately assessed. Data were collected from Swedish company Sandvik Materials Technology (SMT) through a work environment survey in April 2014. Different regression equations were analysed to assess marginal effects of the employer's efforts on overall labour effectiveness (OLE), informal work impairments (IWI), lost working hours (LWH), and labour productivity loss (LPL) in terms of money. The employer's multifactorial efforts resulted in increasing OLE, decreasing IWI and illness-related LWH, and cost savings in terms of decreasing LPL. Environmental factors at the workplace are the important determinant factor for OLE, and the latter is where socio-economic impacts of the employer's efforts primarily manifest.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 15%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Lecturer 3 8%
Professor 3 8%
Other 9 23%
Unknown 8 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 15%
Psychology 4 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 5%
Other 9 23%
Unknown 12 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,728,451
of 12,552,783 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
#11
of 128 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,936
of 271,169 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,552,783 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 128 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,169 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them