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Widening disparities in health between educational levels and their determinants in later life: evidence from a nine-year cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
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Title
Widening disparities in health between educational levels and their determinants in later life: evidence from a nine-year cohort study
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5181-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takashi Oshio

Abstract

Education has attracted more attention as a key determinant of health in later life. In this study, the hypothesis that widened educational disparities in health can be observed in later life was investigated, and the factors that mediated the association between education and changes in health were also assessed. Using the 9-year (10-wave) longitudinal data of 20,024 individuals (9320 men and 10,704 women) aged 50-59 years at baseline, collected from a nationwide population survey in Japan (2005-2014), the changes in self-rated health, functional limitations, and psychological distress between educational levels were compared. Mediation analysis was further conducted to assess the factors that mediated the association between education and changes in health, with reference to six types of potential mediators (household spending, social participation, leisure-time physical activity, smoking, problem drinking, and regular health check-ups). The analyses were conducted separately for men and women. All three health variables rapidly deteriorated among lower-educated men and women. For men, the six potential mediators mediated 55.2%, 64.3%, and 47.3% of the associations between educational levels and changes in self-rated health, functional limitations, and psychological distress, respectively. The proportions for women were 42.0%, 49.5%, and 58.8%, respectively. Social participation was the primary mediator, followed by physical activity, regular health check-ups, and smoking. In general, no substantial or consistent differences were observed between men and women. The results suggested that policy measures that encourage social participation and promote healthy behaviors can improve educational disparities in health in later life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Researcher 4 9%
Other 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 13 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 8 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Sports and Recreations 3 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 17 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,862,480
of 12,552,783 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,161
of 8,570 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,174
of 271,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,552,783 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,570 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,168 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them