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Emergency surgery in the elderly: the balance between function, frailty, fatality and futility

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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64 Dimensions

Readers on

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126 Mendeley
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Title
Emergency surgery in the elderly: the balance between function, frailty, fatality and futility
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13049-015-0099-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kjetil Søreide, Kari F Desserud

Abstract

Becoming old is considered a privilege and results from the socioeconomic progress and improvements in health care systems worldwide. However, morbidity and mortality increases with age, and even more so in acute onset disease. With the current prospects of longevity, a considerable number of elderly patients will continue to live with good function and excellent quality of life after emergency surgical care. However, mortality in emergency surgery may be reported at 15-30%, doubled if associated with complications, and notably higher in patients over 75 years. A number of risks associated with death are reported, and a number of scores proposed for prediction of risk. Frailty, a decline in the physiological reserves that may make the person vulnerable to even the most minor of stressful event, appears to be a valid indicator and predictor of risk and poor outcome, but how to best address and measure frailty in the emergency setting is not clear. Futility may sometimes be clearly defined, but most often becomes a borderline decision between ethics, clinical predictions and patient communication for which no solid evidence currently exists. The number and severity of other underlying condition(s), as well as the treatment alternatives and their consequences, is a complex picture to interpret. Add in the onset of the acute surgical disease as a further potential detrimental factor on function and quality of life ¿ and you have a perfect storm to handle. In this brief review, some of the challenging aspects related to emergency surgery in the elderly will be discussed. More research, including registries and trials, are needed for improved knowledge to a growing health care challenge.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 123 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 17%
Researcher 22 17%
Other 20 16%
Student > Postgraduate 13 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Other 23 18%
Unknown 16 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 75 60%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 5%
Psychology 5 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Computer Science 3 2%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 20 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,472,745
of 19,474,859 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#347
of 1,166 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,789
of 308,199 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,474,859 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,166 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 308,199 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them