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The bidirectional association between sleep problems and autism spectrum disorder: a population-based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, January 2018
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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56 Dimensions

Readers on

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139 Mendeley
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Title
The bidirectional association between sleep problems and autism spectrum disorder: a population-based cohort study
Published in
Molecular Autism, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13229-018-0194-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria E. Verhoeff, Laura M. E. Blanken, Desana Kocevska, Viara R. Mileva-Seitz, Vincent W. V. Jaddoe, Tonya White, Frank Verhulst, Maartje P. C. M. Luijk, Henning Tiemeier

Abstract

Sleep difficulties are prevalent in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The temporal nature of the association between sleep problems and ASD is unclear because longitudinal studies are lacking. Our aim is to clarify whether sleep problems precede and worsen autistic traits and ASD or occur as a consequence of the disorder. Repeated sleep measures were available at 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 years of age in 5151 children participating in the Generation R Study, a large prospective birth cohort in the Netherlands. Autistic traits were determined with the Pervasive Developmental Problems score (PDP) of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) at 1.5 and 3 years and the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) at 6 years. This cohort included 81 children diagnosed with ASD. Sleep problems in early childhood were prospectively associated with a higher SRS score, but not when correcting for baseline PDP score. By contrast, a higher SRS score and an ASD diagnosis were associated with more sleep problems at later ages, even when adjusting for baseline sleep problems. Likewise, a trajectory of increasing sleep problems was associated with ASD. Sleep problems and ASD are not bidirectionally associated. Sleep problems do not precede and worsen autistic behavior but rather co-occur with autistic traits in early childhood. Over time, children with ASD have an increase in sleep problems, whereas typically developing children have a decrease in sleep problems. Our findings suggest that sleep problems are part of the construct ASD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 139 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 14%
Researcher 17 12%
Student > Master 17 12%
Student > Bachelor 13 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 34 24%
Unknown 29 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 33 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 11%
Neuroscience 14 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 8%
Social Sciences 9 6%
Other 17 12%
Unknown 40 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,381,192
of 12,612,351 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#266
of 398 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,746
of 272,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#7
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,612,351 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 398 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.7. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,778 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.