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Correlates of social behavior change communication on care-seeking behaviors for children with fever: an analysis of malaria household survey data from Liberia

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
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Title
Correlates of social behavior change communication on care-seeking behaviors for children with fever: an analysis of malaria household survey data from Liberia
Published in
Malaria Journal, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2249-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Grace Awantang, Stella Babalola, Hannah Koenker, Kathleen Fox, Michael Toso, Nan Lewicky, Daniel Somah, Victor Koko

Abstract

In 2010, malaria was responsible for an estimated 41% of deaths among children under the age of five years in Liberia. The same year, the Rebuilding Basic Health Services Project launched "Healthy Baby, Happy Mother," a social and behavior change communication campaign. The campaign encouraged caregivers to take children under the age of five years to a health facility as soon as children developed fever. This study investigated correlates of two case management outcomes: care-seeking for children under five with fever during the past two weeks and administration of an artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) the same or next day as fever onset. Data from a 2014 cross-sectional household survey from four counties was used to investigate correlates of two case management outcomes. Using multilevel analysis, the association between these outcomes and a caregiver's recall of the campaign, her sociodemographic characteristics, and unmeasured characteristics of the community she lived in was investigated. Caregivers living in Grand Kru County were less likely (OR = 0.21, 95% CI 0.073, 0.632) to take a child to a health facility than those in Bong County. Caregiver recall of the campaign was positively associated with the odds that a child received an ACT promptly (OR 3.62, 95% CI 1.398-9.372), but not with the odds of a caregiver taking a child in their care to a health facility. While unmeasured community-level factors accounted for 19.0% of the variation in the odds that a caregiver's child was brought to a health facility, they did not play a role in the odds of prompt ACT treatment. Recalling the "Healthy Mother, Happy Baby" campaign was positively associated with the odds that children received ACT promptly, even in the absence of other malaria prevention and treatment messaging. While caregiver exposure was not associated with care-seeking during the two weeks before interview, prompt care-seeking likely preceded prompt receipt of ACT since most ACT came from health facilities. Unmeasured community-level factors, such as distance from the health facility, may play a role in determining the odds that a caregiver takes a child to a health facility.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 25%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 16 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 15 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 17%
Psychology 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 18 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2021.
All research outputs
#4,717,306
of 19,529,814 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,197
of 5,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,864
of 291,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,529,814 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,109 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,842 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them