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Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, October 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
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Title
Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, October 2006
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-1-39
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cecile Kaplan

Abstract

Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 3%
Unknown 39 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 23%
Student > Master 7 18%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Professor 3 8%
Other 9 23%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2021.
All research outputs
#7,104,974
of 21,839,802 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#1,022
of 2,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,977
of 324,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#4
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,839,802 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,476 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,068 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.