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Glyphosate exposure in pregnancy and shortened gestational length: a prospective Indiana birth cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 1,459)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
36 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
296 tweeters
facebook
35 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
6 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
97 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
208 Mendeley
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Title
Glyphosate exposure in pregnancy and shortened gestational length: a prospective Indiana birth cohort study
Published in
Environmental Health, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12940-018-0367-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Parvez, R. R. Gerona, C. Proctor, M. Friesen, J. L. Ashby, J. L. Reiter, Z. Lui, P. D. Winchester

Abstract

Glyphosate (GLY) is the most heavily used herbicide worldwide but the extent of exposure in human pregnancy remains unknown. Its residues are found in the environment, major crops, and food items that humans, including pregnant women, consume daily. Since GLY exposure in pregnancy may also increase fetal exposure risk, we designed a birth-cohort study to determine exposure frequency, potential exposure pathways, and associations with fetal growth indicators and pregnancy length. Urine and residential drinking water samples were obtained from 71 women with singleton pregnancies living in Central Indiana while they received routine prenatal care. GLY measurements were performed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Demographic and survey information relating to food and water consumption, stress, and residence were obtained by questionnaire. Maternal risk factors and neonatal outcomes were abstracted from medical records. Correlation analyses were used to assess relationships of urine GLY levels with fetal growth indicators and gestational length. The mean age of participants was 29 years, and the majority were Caucasian. Ninety three percent of the pregnant women had GLY levels above the limit of detection (0.1 ng/mL). Mean urinary GLY was 3.40 ng/mL (range 0.5-7.20 ng/mL). Higher GLY levels were found in women who lived in rural areas (p = 0.02), and in those who consumed > 24 oz. of caffeinated beverages per day (p = 0.004). None of the drinking water samples had detectable GLY levels. We observed no correlations with fetal growth indicators such as birth weight percentile and head circumference. However, higher GLY urine levels were significantly correlated with shortened gestational lengths (r = - 0.28, p = 0.02). This is the first study of GLY exposure in US pregnant women using urine specimens as a direct measure of exposure. We found that > 90% of pregnant women had detectable GLY levels and that these levels correlated significantly with shortened pregnancy lengths. Although our study cohort was small and regional and had limited racial/ethnic diversity, it provides direct evidence of maternal GLY exposure and a significant correlation with shortened pregnancy. Further investigations in a more geographically and racially diverse cohort would be necessary before these findings could be generalized.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 296 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 208 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 208 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 17%
Student > Bachelor 30 14%
Researcher 24 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 4%
Other 32 15%
Unknown 61 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 10%
Environmental Science 18 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 7%
Other 48 23%
Unknown 67 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 524. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2022.
All research outputs
#36,582
of 22,132,418 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#16
of 1,459 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,003
of 298,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,132,418 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,459 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,515 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them