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Low dose Naltrexone for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease patients

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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94 Mendeley
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Title
Low dose Naltrexone for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease patients
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12967-018-1427-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mitchell R. K. L. Lie, Janine van der Giessen, Gwenny M. Fuhler, Alison de Lima, Maikel P. Peppelenbosch, Cokkie van der Ent, C. Janneke van der Woude

Abstract

Around 30% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are refractory to current IBD drugs or relapse over time. Novel treatments are called for, and low dose Naltrexone (LDN) may provide a safe, easily accessible alternative treatment option for these patients. We investigated the potential of LDN to induce clinical response in therapy refractory IBD patients, and investigated its direct effects on epithelial barrier function. Patients not in remission and not responding to conventional therapy were offered to initiate LDN as a concomitant treatment. In total 47 IBD patients prescribed LDN were followed prospectively for 12 weeks. Where available, endoscopic remission data, serum and biopsies were collected. Further the effect of Naltrexone on wound healing (scratch assay), cytokine production and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (GRP78 and CHOP western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry) were investigated in HCT116 and CACO2 intestinal epithelial cells, human IBD intestinal organoids and patient samples. Low dose Naltrexone induced clinical improvement in 74.5%, and remission in 25.5% of patients. Naltrexone improved wound healing and reduced ER stress induced by Tunicamycin, lipopolysaccharide or bacteria in epithelial barriers. Inflamed mucosa from IBD patients showed high ER stress levels, which was reduced in patients treated with LDN. Cytokine levels in neither epithelial cells nor serum from IBD patients were affected. Naltrexone directly improves epithelial barrier function by improving wound healing and reducing mucosal ER stress levels. Low dose Naltrexone treatment is effective and safe, and could be considered for the treatment of therapy refractory IBD patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 94 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 17%
Other 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Researcher 9 10%
Other 17 18%
Unknown 24 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 26 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2021.
All research outputs
#1,399,688
of 19,629,044 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#231
of 3,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,995
of 292,746 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,629,044 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,468 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,746 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them