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Spontaneous regression of a primary squamous cell lung cancer following biopsy: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, March 2018
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
Spontaneous regression of a primary squamous cell lung cancer following biopsy: a case report
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13256-018-1589-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathan Esplin, Khadija Fergiani, Timothy B. Legare, John W. Stelzer, Hammad Bhatti, Sayed K. Ali

Abstract

Spontaneous regression has been defined as occurring when the malignant tumor mass partially or completely disappears without any treatment or as a result of a therapy considered inadequate to influence systemic neoplastic disease. Recently, studies have implicated immunological responses as likely being involved. We report a case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung who experienced spontaneous regression following biopsy without other intervention. A 57-year-old white man was referred to our pulmonary clinic after an incidental finding of a nodule in the lower lobe of his left lung. Thoracic computed tomography revealed a 2.0 × 1.4 × 1.5 cm spiculated nodule in the superior segment of the left lower lobe. Workup identified the mass as a squamous cell carcinoma that was clinically staged as T1M0N0. The patient deferred treatment of this lesion. He undertook no significant lifestyle or medical changes. Three months later, computed tomography revealed that, compared with the initial study, the solitary mass had decreased in size to 1.6 × 0.9 × 0.9 cm. Follow-up computed tomography 1 year after the original workup demonstrated that the nodule had stabilized to its smaller size. Studies have shown that immunological response can be initiated by trauma to an area. Because the tumor regression became evident in our patient only after the tissue biopsy, his immune response to the surgical procedure seems to be a plausible contributor to the spontaneous regression. Further understanding of spontaneous regression can potentially impact the identification of neoplastic drug targets or even the course of a patient's treatment plan and goals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 19%
Lecturer 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 5 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 31%
Unspecified 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 5 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2019.
All research outputs
#8,795,091
of 14,990,969 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#644
of 2,501 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,145
of 277,339 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,990,969 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,501 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,339 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them