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Postmenarche growth: cohort study among indigenous and non-indigenous Chilean adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2015
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Title
Postmenarche growth: cohort study among indigenous and non-indigenous Chilean adolescents
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1389-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hugo Amigo, Macarena Lara, Patricia Bustos, Sergio Muñoz

Abstract

BackgroundIn Chile, indigenous and non-indigenous schoolchildren have the same stature when they begin school but indigenous adults are shorter, indicating the importance of analyzing growth during puberty. The aim of this study was to compare the growth of indigenous and non-indigenous girls during the 36 months after menarche in Chile¿s Araucanía Region.MethodsA concurrent cohort study was conducted to compare growth in the two ethnic groups, which were comprised of 114 indigenous and 126 non-indigenous girls who recently experienced menarche and were randomly selected. Height was measured at menarche and at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months post-menarche. General linear models were used to analyze growth and a generalized estimating equation model was used to compare height at 36 months post-menarche.ResultsAt menarche, the Z-score of height/age was less for indigenous than non-indigenous girls (¿0.01 vs. -0.61, p¿<¿0.001). Indigenous girls grew at a slower rate than non-indigenous girls (6.5 vs. 7.2 cm, p¿=¿0.02), and height at 36-months post-menarche reached ¿0.82 vs. -0.35 cm (p <0.001). In an adjusted model at 36 months post-menarche, indigenous girls were 1.6 cm shorter than non-indigenous girls (95% confidence interval: ¿3.13 to ¿0.04).ConclusionsThe height of indigenous girls at menarche was lower than that of non-indigenous girls and they subsequently grew less, maintaining the gap between the two groups. At the end of the follow-up period, the indigenous girls were shorter than their non-indigenous peers.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 15%
Social Sciences 4 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 8 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2015.
All research outputs
#3,349,403
of 4,723,481 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,531
of 5,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,369
of 165,242 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#137
of 161 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,723,481 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,313 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 161 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.