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Nicotine dependence in an isolated population of Kashubians from North Poland: a population survey

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Nicotine dependence in an isolated population of Kashubians from North Poland: a population survey
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1455-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alicja Sieminska, Ewa Jassem, Karolina Kita-Milczarska

Abstract

BackgroundTobacco use is a complex, multistage behaviour. The particular stages of this behaviour, including nicotine dependence (ND), are influenced by both genetics and the environment. Surveys on factors influencing tobacco use and ND, conducted in ethnically homogenous populations, can provide results less influenced by genetic and cultural heterogeneity. We aimed to assess ND in a sample of current smokers, derived from the geographically and culturally isolated population of Kashubians from North Poland, and evaluate its potential association with age, sex, and self-reported comorbidities. In addition, we attempted to replicate - for the first time in this population - previous findings on the association between ND and several variants within the CHRNA5A3-A5-B4 nicotine receptor subunit gene cluster.MethodsThe study sample consisted of 969 unrelated subjects who were all current smokers. ND was evaluated using four measures: the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND), the Heavy Smoking Index (HSI), the number of cigarettes per day (CPD) and the time to first cigarette after waking (TTF). All subjects underwent genotyping for CHRNA5 rs16969968, CHRNA3 rs578776, and CHRNB4 rs12914008 variants. Multivariate regression analysis was used for the assessment of the studied correlations. A significance level of 0.05 with the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing was set for a type 1 error in the analyses.ResultsThe mean CPD, FTND and HSI scores in the study sample were 17.3¿±¿7.7, 3.9¿±¿2.3 and 2.6¿±¿1.5, respectively. No association between ND defined by FTND, HSI or TTF and age was found. In turn, heavy smoking was significantly associated with older age (odds ratio (OR)¿=¿1.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.59, p¿=¿0.009), and men were more likely than women to be heavy smokers (OR¿=¿1.70, 95% CI: 1.09-2.65, p¿=¿0.018). Chronic comorbidity did not significantly influence ND. An analysis of association of studied polymorphisms with ND showed a borderline association of rs16969968 with CPD (OR¿=¿1.63, 95% CI: 1.09¿2.45, p¿=¿0.017).ConclusionOur study showed a low to moderate level of ND in the Kashubians, influenced by age, sex, as well as the CHRNA5 rs16969968 variant.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 15%
Unspecified 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Unknown 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Computer Science 1 8%
Other 3 23%
Unknown 2 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2015.
All research outputs
#639,647
of 4,715,210 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,074
of 5,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,601
of 165,427 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#46
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,715,210 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,304 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 165,427 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.