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Herbal medicine for sports: a review

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
twitter
25 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

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45 Dimensions

Readers on

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386 Mendeley
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Title
Herbal medicine for sports: a review
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12970-018-0218-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maha Sellami, Olfa Slimeni, Andrzej Pokrywka, Goran Kuvačić, Lawrence D Hayes, Mirjana Milic, Johnny Padulo

Abstract

The use of herbal medicinal products and supplements has increased during last decades. At present, some herbs are used to enhance muscle strength and body mass. Emergent evidence suggests that the health benefits from plants are attributed to their bioactive compounds such as Polyphenols, Terpenoids, and Alkaloids which have several physiological effects on the human body. At times, manufacturers launch numerous products with banned ingredient inside with inappropriate amounts or fake supplement inducing harmful side effect. Unfortunately up to date, there is no guarantee that herbal supplements are safe for anyone to use and it has not helped to clear the confusion surrounding the herbal use in sport field especially. Hence, the purpose of this review is to provide guidance on the efficacy and side effect of most used plants in sport. We have identified plants according to the following categories: Ginseng, alkaloids, and other purported herbal ergogenics such as Tribulus Terrestris, Cordyceps Sinensis. We found that most herbal supplement effects are likely due to activation of the central nervous system via stimulation of catecholamines. Ginseng was used as an endurance performance enhancer, while alkaloids supplementation resulted in improvements in sprint and cycling intense exercises. Despite it is prohibited, small amount of ephedrine was usually used in combination with caffeine to enhance muscle strength in trained individuals. Some other alkaloids such as green tea extracts have been used to improve body mass and composition in athletes. Other herb (i.e. Rhodiola, Astragalus) help relieve muscle and joint pain, but results about their effects on exercise performance are missing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 386 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 386 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 72 19%
Student > Master 57 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 8%
Researcher 29 8%
Student > Postgraduate 20 5%
Other 71 18%
Unknown 107 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 52 13%
Sports and Recreations 46 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 36 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 28 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 7%
Other 66 17%
Unknown 131 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 112. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2020.
All research outputs
#250,405
of 19,579,367 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#88
of 840 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,323
of 293,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,579,367 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 840 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,118 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them