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Flexibility of foraging strategies of the great skua Stercorarius skua breeding in the largest colony in the Barents Sea region

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, March 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Flexibility of foraging strategies of the great skua Stercorarius skua breeding in the largest colony in the Barents Sea region
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12983-018-0257-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dariusz Jakubas, Lech M. Iliszko, Hallvard Strøm, Halfdan H. Helgason, Lech Stempniewicz

Abstract

Foraging strategies of seabird species often vary considerably between and within individuals. This variability is influenced by a multitude of factors including age, sex, stage of annual life cycle, reproductive status, individual specialization and environmental conditions. Using GPS-loggers, we investigated factors affecting foraging flight characteristics (total duration, maximal range, total distance covered) of great skuas Stercorarius skua of known sex breeding on Bjørnøya, Svalbard, the largest colony in the Barents Sea region. We examined influence of sex (females are larger than males), phase of breeding (incubation, chick-rearing), reproductive status (breeders, failed breeders) and bird ID (they are known for individual foraging specialization). Our analyses revealed that only bird ID affected foraging flight characteristics significantly, indicating a high degree of plasticity regardless of sex, reproductive status or phase of breeding. We recognized three main groups of individuals: 1) those preying mainly on other seabirds in the breeding colonies (6%), 2) those foraging at sea (76%) and kleptoparasiting other seabirds and/or foraging on fish and/or offal discarded by fishing vessels, and 3) those alternating between preying on other seabirds in breeding colonies and foraging at sea (18%). Despite marked size sexual dimorphism, we found no apparent sex differences in flight characteristics. Birds after egg- or chick-loss and thus not constrained as central foragers did not modify their foraging flights. Great skuas breeding on Bjørnøya displayed a high degree of plasticity regardless of sex, reproductive status or phase of breeding. We recognized groups of individuals regularly preying in the seabird colonies, foraging at sea, and alternating between both strategies. This suggests foraging specialization of some individuals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 31%
Student > Master 7 18%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 46%
Environmental Science 8 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Design 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2018.
All research outputs
#2,898,888
of 16,607,885 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#182
of 547 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,365
of 284,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,607,885 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 547 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,040 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them