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Nationwide insecticide resistance status and biting behaviour of malaria vector species in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, March 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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78 Mendeley
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Title
Nationwide insecticide resistance status and biting behaviour of malaria vector species in the Democratic Republic of Congo
Published in
Malaria Journal, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2285-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francis Wat’senga, Emile Zola Manzambi, Andre Lunkula, Roger Mulumbu, Tania Mampangulu, Neil Lobo, Allison Hendershot, Christen Fornadel, Djenam Jacob, Mame Niang, Ferdinand Ntoya, Tamfum Muyembe, Joris Likwela, Seth R. Irish, Richard M. Oxborough

Abstract

Globally, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) accounted for 9% of malaria cases and 10% of malaria deaths in 2015. As part of control efforts, more than 40 million long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) were distributed between 2008 and 2013, resulting in 70% of households owning one or more LLINs in 2014. To optimize vector control efforts, it is critical to monitor vector behaviour and insecticide resistance trends. Entomological data was collected from eight sentinel sites throughout DRC between 2013 and 2016 in Kingasani, Mikalayi, Lodja, Kabondo, Katana, Kapolowe, Tshikaji and Kalemie. Mosquito species present, relative densities and biting times were monitored using human landing catches (HLC) conducted in eight houses, three times per year. HLC was conducted monthly in Lodja and Kapolowe during 2016 to assess seasonal dynamics. Laboratory data included resistance mechanism frequency and sporozoite rates. Insecticide susceptibility testing was conducted with commonly used insecticides including deltamethrin and permethrin. Synergist bioassays were conducted with PBO to determine the role of oxidases in permethrin resistance. In Lodja, monthly Anopheles gambiae s.l. biting rates were consistently high at > 10 bites/person/night indoors and outdoors. In Kapolowe, An. gambiae s.l. dominated during the rainy season, and Anopheles funestus s.l. during the dry season. In all sites, An. gambiae and An. funestus biting occurred mostly late at night. In Kapolowe, significant biting of both species started around 19:00, typically before householders use nets. Sporozoite rates were high, with a mean of 4.3% (95% CI 3.4-5.2) for An. gambiae and 3.3% (95% CI 1.3-5.3) for An. funestus. Anopheles gambiae were resistant to permethrin in six out of seven sites in 2016. In three sites, susceptibility to deltamethrin was observed despite high frequency permethrin resistance, indicating the presence of pyrethroid-specific resistance mechanisms. Pre-exposure to PBO increased absolute permethrin-associated mortality by 24%, indicating that resistance was partly due to metabolic mechanisms. The kdr-1014F mutation in An. gambiae was present at high frequency (> 70%) in three sites (Kabondo, Kingasani and Tshikaji), and lower frequency (< 20%) in two sites (Lodja and Kapolowe). The finding of widespread resistance to permethrin in DRC is concerning and alternative insecticides should be evaluated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 17%
Student > Master 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 4%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 19 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Engineering 5 6%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 18 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2018.
All research outputs
#4,175,268
of 15,922,425 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,236
of 4,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,831
of 281,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,425 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,495 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,238 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them