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Feasibility and acceptability of expressive writing with postpartum women: a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Feasibility and acceptability of expressive writing with postpartum women: a randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12884-018-1703-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosalind Crawley, Susan Ayers, Susan Button, Alexandra Thornton, Andy P. Field, Suzanne Lee, Andrew Eagle, Robert Bradley, Donna Moore, Gill Gyte, Helen Smith

Abstract

Pregnancy, birth and adjusting to a new baby is a potentially stressful time that can negatively affect women's mental and physical health. Expressive writing, where people write about a stressful event for at least 15 min on three consecutive days, has been associated with improved health in some groups but it is not clear whether it is feasible and acceptable for use with postpartum women. This study therefore examined the feasibility and acceptability of expressive writing for postpartum women as part of a randomised controlled trial (RCT). The Health After Birth Trial (HABiT) was an RCT evaluating expressive writing for postpartum women which included measures of feasibility and acceptability. At 6 to 12 weeks after birth 854 women were randomised to expressive writing, a control writing task or normal care, and outcome measures of health were measured at baseline, one month later and six months later. Feasibility was measured by recruitment, attrition, and adherence to the intervention. Quantitative and qualitative measures of acceptability of the materials and the task were completed six months after the intervention. Recruitment was low (10.7% of those invited to participate) and the recruited sample was from a restricted sociodemographic range. Attrition was high, increased as the study progressed (35.8% at baseline, 57.5% at one month, and 68.1% at six months) and was higher in the writing groups than in the normal care group. Women complied with instructions to write expressively or not, but adherence to the instruction to write for 15 min per day for three days was low (Expressive writing: 29.3%; Control writing: 23.5%). Acceptability measures showed that women who wrote expressively rated the materials/task both more positively and more negatively than those in the control writing group, and qualitative comments revealed that women enjoyed the writing and/or found it helpful even when it was upsetting. The feasibility of offering expressive writing as a universal self-help intervention to all postpartum women 6 to 12 weeks after birth in the HABiT trial was low, but the expressive writing intervention was acceptable to the majority of women who completed it. ISRCTN58399513, 10/09/2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Master 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 29 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 15%
Psychology 8 12%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 27 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,265,236
of 20,526,175 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#2,015
of 3,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,827
of 295,780 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,526,175 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,691 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,780 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them