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A biomaterials approach to influence stem cell fate in injectable cell-based therapies

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, February 2018
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Title
A biomaterials approach to influence stem cell fate in injectable cell-based therapies
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13287-018-0789-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mahetab H. Amer, Felicity R. A. J. Rose, Kevin M. Shakesheff, Lisa J. White

Abstract

Numerous stem cell therapies use injection-based administration to deliver high-density cell preparations. However, cell retention rates as low as 1% have been observed within days of transplantation. This study investigated the effects of varying administration and formulation parameters of injection-based administration on cell dose recovery and differentiation fate choice of human mesenchymal stem cells. The impact of ejection rate via clinically relevant Hamilton micro-syringes and biomaterial-assisted delivery was investigated. Cell viability, the percentage of cell dose delivered as viable cells, proliferation capacity as well as differentiation behaviour in bipotential media were assessed. Characterisation of the biomaterial-based cell carriers was also carried out. A significant improvement of in-vitro dose recovery in cells co-ejected with natural biomaterials was observed, with ejections within 2% (w/v) gelatin resulting in 87.5 ± 14% of the cell dose being delivered as viable cells, compared to 32.2 ± 19% of the dose ejected in the commonly used saline vehicle at 10 μl/min. Improvement in cell recovery was not associated with the rheological properties of biomaterials utilised, as suggested by previous studies. The extent of osteogenic differentiation was shown to be substantially altered by choice of ejection rate and cell carrier, despite limited contact time with cells during ejection. Collagen type I and bone-derived extracellular matrix cell carriers yielded significant increases in mineralised matrix deposited at day 21 relative to PBS. An enhanced understanding of how administration protocols and biomaterials influence cell recovery, differentiation capacity and choice of fate will facilitate the development of improved administration and formulation approaches to achieve higher efficacy in stem cell transplantation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Student > Master 6 13%
Researcher 6 13%
Other 3 6%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Neuroscience 4 9%
Engineering 4 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 18 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 March 2018.
All research outputs
#14,187,193
of 17,769,673 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1,263
of 1,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,666
of 287,448 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,769,673 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,791 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,448 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them