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Identifying non-traditional stakeholders with whom to engage, when mitigating antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens (Canada)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, March 2018
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Title
Identifying non-traditional stakeholders with whom to engage, when mitigating antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens (Canada)
Published in
BMC Research Notes, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3279-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shannon E. Majowicz, E. Jane Parmley, Carolee Carson, Katarina Pintar

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a critical public health issue that involves interrelationships between people, animals, and the environment. Traditionally, interdisciplinary efforts to mitigate AMR in the food chain have involved public health, human and veterinary medicine, and agriculture stakeholders. Our objective was to identify a more diverse range of stakeholders, beyond those traditionally engaged in AMR mitigation efforts, via diagramming both proximal and distal factors impacting, or impacted by, use and resistance along the Canadian food chain. We identified multiple stakeholders that are not traditionally engaged by public health when working to mitigate AMR in the food chain, including those working broadly in the area of food (e.g., nutrition, food security, international market economists) and health (e.g., health communication, program evaluation), as well as in domains as diverse as law, politics, demography, education, and social innovation. These findings can help researchers and policymakers who work on issues related to AMR in the food chain to move beyond engaging the 'traditional' agri-food stakeholders (e.g., veterinarians, farmers), to also engage those from the wider domains identified here, as potential stakeholders in their AMR mitigation efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Master 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 19 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 10%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 7%
Other 16 26%
Unknown 19 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2020.
All research outputs
#14,163,614
of 17,740,717 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#2,561
of 3,712 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,489
of 287,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,740,717 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,712 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,353 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them