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Negative cancer beliefs, recognition of cancer symptoms and anticipated time to help-seeking: an international cancer benchmarking partnership (ICBP) study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
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Title
Negative cancer beliefs, recognition of cancer symptoms and anticipated time to help-seeking: an international cancer benchmarking partnership (ICBP) study
Published in
BMC Cancer, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12885-018-4287-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anette Fischer Pedersen, Lindsay Forbes, Kate Brain, Line Hvidberg, Christian Nielsen Wulff, Magdalena Lagerlund, Senada Hajdarevic, Samantha L. Quaife, Peter Vedsted

Abstract

Understanding what influences people to seek help can inform interventions to promote earlier diagnosis of cancer, and ultimately better cancer survival. We aimed to examine relationships between negative cancer beliefs, recognition of cancer symptoms and how long people think they would take to go to the doctor with possible cancer symptoms (anticipated patient intervals). Telephone interviews of 20,814 individuals (50+) in the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden were carried out using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer Measure (ABC). ABC included items on cancer beliefs, recognition of cancer symptoms and anticipated time to help-seeking for cough and rectal bleeding. The anticipated time to help-seeking was dichotomised as over one month for persistent cough and over one week for rectal bleeding. Not recognising persistent cough/hoarseness and unexplained bleeding as cancer symptoms increased the likelihood of a longer anticipated patient interval for persistent cough (OR = 1.66; 95%CI = 1.47-1.87) and rectal bleeding (OR = 1.90; 95%CI = 1.58-2.30), respectively. Endorsing four or more out of six negative beliefs about cancer increased the likelihood of longer anticipated patient intervals for persistent cough and rectal bleeding (OR = 2.18; 95%CI = 1.71-2.78 and OR = 1.97; 95%CI = 1.51-2.57). Many negative beliefs about cancer moderated the relationship between not recognising unexplained bleeding as a cancer symptom and longer anticipated patient interval for rectal bleeding (p = 0.005). Intervention studies should address both negative beliefs about cancer and knowledge of symptoms to optimise the effect.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 19%
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Lecturer 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 6 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 22%
Psychology 6 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 11%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 7 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2018.
All research outputs
#2,224,368
of 13,779,708 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#549
of 5,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,166
of 271,659 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,779,708 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,172 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,659 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them