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Modeling autosomal dominant optic atrophy using induced pluripotent stem cells and identifying potential therapeutic targets

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Modeling autosomal dominant optic atrophy using induced pluripotent stem cells and identifying potential therapeutic targets
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13287-015-0264-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jing Chen, Hamidreza Riazifar, Min-Xin Guan, Taosheng Huang

Abstract

Many retinal degenerative diseases are caused by the loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Autosomal dominant optic atrophy is the most common hereditary optic atrophy disease and is characterized by central vision loss and degeneration of RGCs. Currently, there is no effective treatment for this group of diseases. However, stem cell therapy holds great potential for replacing lost RGCs of patients. Compared with embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from adult somatic cells, and they are associated with fewer ethical concerns and are less prone to immune rejection. In addition, patient-derived iPSCs may provide us with a cellular model for studying the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic agents for optic atrophy. In this study, iPSCs were obtained from patients carrying an OPA1 mutation (OPA1 (+/-) -iPSC) that were diagnosed with optic atrophy. These iPSCs were differentiated into putative RGCs, which were subsequently characterized by using RGC-specific expression markers BRN3a and ISLET-1. Mutant OPA1 (+/-) -iPSCs exhibited significantly more apoptosis and were unable to efficiently differentiate into RGCs. However, with the addition of neural induction medium, Noggin, or estrogen, OPA1 (+/-) -iPSC differentiation into RGCs was promoted. Our results suggest that apoptosis mediated by OPA1 mutations plays an important role in the pathogenesis of optic atrophy, and both noggin and β-estrogen may represent potential therapeutic agents for OPA1-related optic atrophy.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Other 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 10 21%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Neuroscience 6 13%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 10 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2019.
All research outputs
#4,678,191
of 15,028,834 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#439
of 1,379 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,770
of 277,298 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,028,834 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,379 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,298 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them