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Effects of chewing gum against postoperative ileus after pancreaticoduodenectomy – a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2015
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Citations

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Title
Effects of chewing gum against postoperative ileus after pancreaticoduodenectomy – a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-0996-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Andersson, Kristofer Bjerså, Kristin Falk, Monika Fagevik Olsén

Abstract

Postoperative ileus is common after surgery. One non-pharmacological intervention that has shown promising results in reducing the duration of postoperative ileus is chewing gum after surgery. However, this has not been investigated in upper gastrointestinal surgery such as pancreatic surgery. Hence the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chewing gum treatment on patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple due to pancreatic or periampullary cancer. This study was conducted as a phase III trial that was terminated early. Patients diagnosed with pancreatic tumours scheduled for pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple were included. The treatment group received chewing gum postoperatively and standard care. Controls received glucose solution and standard care. Chewing gum and glucose were used four times a day during the whole hospital stay. Time to first flatus and stool was defined as the primary outcome. The secondary outcome was start with clear liquids, start with liquid diet and length of hospital stay. No statistically significant differences could be observed between the chewing gum intervention group and the control group. However, a numerical difference in mean time was observed in first flatus, first stool, start of clear fluids, and start of liquid diet and length of hospital stay in favour of the intervention group. Although this study did not find statistically significant differences favouring the use of chewing gum for postoperative ileus, a positive trend was observed of a reduction of the impact of postoperative ileus among patients after pancreatic surgery. It also contributes valuable methodological experience that is important for future studies of chewing gum interventions during recovery after pancreatic surgery. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02319512 , publication date 2014-12-17.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 95 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 20%
Student > Master 16 16%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Postgraduate 8 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 8%
Other 18 19%
Unknown 16 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 22%
Engineering 3 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 22 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2015.
All research outputs
#3,329,735
of 4,991,815 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,029
of 1,596 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,094
of 179,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#24
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,991,815 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,596 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 179,574 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.