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Adolescent mental health education InSciEd Out: a case study of an alternative middle school population

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, April 2018
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Title
Adolescent mental health education InSciEd Out: a case study of an alternative middle school population
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12967-018-1459-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joanna Yang, Roberto Lopez Cervera, Susannah J. Tye, Stephen C. Ekker, Chris Pierret

Abstract

Mental illness contributes substantially to global disease burden, particularly when illness onset occurs during youth and help-seeking is delayed and/or limited. Yet, few mental health promotion interventions target youth, particularly those with or at high risk of developing mental illness ("at-risk" youth). Community-based translational research has the capacity to identify and intervene upon barriers to positive health outcomes. This is especially important for integrated care in at-risk youth populations. Here the Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) program delivered a novel school-based anti-stigma intervention in mental health to a cohort of seventh and eighth grade at-risk students. These students were assessed for changes in mental health knowledge, stigmatization, and help-seeking intentions via a classroom activity, surveys, and teacher interviews. Descriptive statistics and Cohen's d effect sizes were employed to assess pre-post changes. Inferential statistical analyses were also conducted on pilot results to provide a benchmark to inform future studies. Elimination of mental health misconceptions (substance weakness p = 0.00; recovery p = 0.05; prevention p = 0.05; violent p = 0.05) was accompanied by slight gains in mental health literacy (d = 0.18) and small to medium improvements in help-seeking intentions (anxiety d = 0.24; depression d = 0.48; substance d = 0.43; psychosis d = 0.53). Within this particular cohort of students, stigma was exceptionally low at baseline and remained largely unchanged. Teacher narratives revealed positive teacher views of programming, increased student openness to talk about mental illness, and higher peer and self-acceptance of mental health diagnoses and help-seeking. Curricular-based efforts focused on mental illness in an alternative school setting are feasible and integrated well into general curricula under the InSciEd Out framework. Preliminary data suggest the existence of unique help-seeking barriers in at-risk youth. Increased focus upon community-based programming has potential to bridge gaps in translation, bringing this critical population to clinical care in pursuit of improved mental health for all. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, ID:NCT02680899. Registered 12 February 2016, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02680899.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 134 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 14%
Researcher 17 13%
Student > Bachelor 16 12%
Other 12 9%
Unknown 30 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 35 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 12%
Social Sciences 11 8%
Sports and Recreations 4 3%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 36 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2018.
All research outputs
#10,191,370
of 12,761,472 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#2,309
of 2,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#205,289
of 273,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,761,472 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,515 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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