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Cortical activation changes and improved motor function in stroke patients after focal spasticity therapy– an interventional study applying repeated fMRI

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, April 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

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Title
Cortical activation changes and improved motor function in stroke patients after focal spasticity therapy– an interventional study applying repeated fMRI
Published in
BMC Neurology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12883-015-0306-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ulla Bergfeldt, Tomas Jonsson, Lennart Bergfeldt, Per Julin

Abstract

Impaired dominant hand function in stroke patients is a common clinical problem. Functional improvement after focal spasticity therapy is well documented but knowledge about central correlates is sparse. Brain activity was therefore followed during therapy with repeated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The purpose was to analyse motor function and central nervous system (CNS) correlates in response to a standardized motor task in stroke patients after a comprehensive focal spasticity therapy. Six consecutive first-time chronic stroke patients [4 women; mean age (SD) 66 (10) years] with right-sided hand paresis and spasticity were studied. Peripheral effects after focal spasticity management including intramuscular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections were assessed on 3 occasions (baseline, 6 and 12 weeks) with functional tests. Brain effects were assessed on the same occasions by fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) technique during a standardized motor task focusing on the motor and pre-motor cortex (Brodmann areas, BA4a, BA4p & BA6). For reference 10 healthy individuals [5 women; mean age (SD) of 51(8) years], were studied twice with ≥ 6 weeks interval. After therapy there was a significant reduction in spasticity and functional improvement in 5 of 6 patients. In response to the motor task there was a ~1.5 - 3% increase in brain activity in the motor and pre-motor cortex. At baseline, this increase was larger in the non-injured (ipsilateral) than in the contralateral hemisphere. Compared with healthy subjects the patients showed a significantly (2-4.5 times) higher brain activity, especially on the ipsilateral side. After therapy, there was a larger decrease in the ipsilateral and a minor decrease in the contralateral response, i.e. a clear lateralization of left-to-right in a normalizing direction in all areas. Comprehensive focal spasticity management was also in this study associated with brain reorganization in a "normalizing" left/right lateralization direction in addition to improved motor function. Furthermore, quantification of BOLD intensity in specified BAs showed reduced neuronal "over-activity" in the injured brain after therapy.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Hong Kong 1 1%
Singapore 1 1%
Unknown 84 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 10 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Student > Master 8 9%
Other 20 23%
Unknown 14 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Neuroscience 9 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Psychology 4 5%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 20 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2021.
All research outputs
#6,049,070
of 19,265,364 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#672
of 2,077 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,748
of 292,756 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,265,364 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,077 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,756 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them