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Overview of attention for article published in BMC Bioinformatics, January 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
263 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
331 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Published in
BMC Bioinformatics, January 2006
DOI 10.1186/1471-2105-7-498
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philipp N Seibel, Tobias Müller, Thomas Dandekar, Jörg Schultz, Matthias Wolf

Abstract

In sequence analysis the multiple alignment builds the fundament of all proceeding analyses. Errors in an alignment could strongly influence all succeeding analyses and therefore could lead to wrong predictions. Hand-crafted and hand-improved alignments are necessary and meanwhile good common practice. For RNA sequences often the primary sequence as well as a secondary structure consensus is well known, e.g., the cloverleaf structure of the t-RNA. Recently, some alignment editors are proposed that are able to include and model both kinds of information. However, with the advent of a large amount of reliable RNA sequences together with their solved secondary structures (available from e.g. the ITS2 Database), we are faced with the problem to handle sequences and their associated secondary structures synchronously.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 331 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 9 3%
United States 6 2%
Brazil 5 2%
United Kingdom 4 1%
Portugal 3 <1%
France 3 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Other 10 3%
Unknown 287 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 110 33%
Researcher 66 20%
Student > Master 54 16%
Student > Bachelor 22 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 5%
Other 46 14%
Unknown 18 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 164 50%
Computer Science 65 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 40 12%
Engineering 10 3%
Mathematics 8 2%
Other 20 6%
Unknown 24 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2008.
All research outputs
#3,577,528
of 12,373,386 outputs
Outputs from BMC Bioinformatics
#1,717
of 4,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,386
of 268,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Bioinformatics
#26
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,386 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,576 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,168 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.