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New indexes of body fat distribution and sex-specific risk of total and cause-specific mortality: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2018
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3 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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43 Mendeley
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Title
New indexes of body fat distribution and sex-specific risk of total and cause-specific mortality: a prospective cohort study
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5350-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susanne Rost, Dennis Freuer, Annette Peters, Barbara Thorand, Rolf Holle, Jakob Linseisen, Christa Meisinger

Abstract

A number of prior studies have examined the association between anthropometric measures and mortality, but studies investigating the sex-specific predictive value of novel anthropometric measures on mortality are scarce so far. Therefore, we investigated the sex-specific relevance of the new anthropometric measures body adiposity index (BAI) and waist to height ratio (WHtR) as well as the common measures body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist to hip ratio (WHR) for cause-specific mortality risk. The analysis was based on data from the German population based KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) Augsburg cohort study. A total of 6670 men and 6637 women aged 25 to 74 years at baseline examination were included. During a mean follow-up period of 15.4 years, 2409 persons died. Via Cox proportional hazard regression, the associations between the different anthropometric measures and all cause-, cardiovascular disease (CVD)- and cancer mortality were assessed. BMI, WC, and WHR were significantly associated with all-cause and CVD-mortality in both sexes. WC and WHR were particularly associated with higher all-cause and CVD-mortality risk in women, while in men especially WHtR and BAI were strongly related to these outcomes. Females with WC, WHtR, and WHR measures in the 4th quartile compared with women in the 2nd quartile had a higher risk of death from cancer. Contrary, men in the lowest quartile of WC and WHtR in comparison to men in the 2nd quartile had a significantly elevated cancer mortality risk. BAI was no risk predictor for all-cause and cause-specific mortality in women. Central obesity reflects higher all-cause and CVD-mortality risk particularly in women. BAI and WHtR seem to be valid as risk predictors for all-cause and especially CVD mortality in men but not women. There are marked sex-differences regarding cancer mortality risk for the different anthropometric measures.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 19%
Researcher 8 19%
Student > Master 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 15 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 12%
Sports and Recreations 1 2%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 18 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,700,649
of 12,770,714 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,222
of 8,710 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,748
of 273,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,770,714 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,710 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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