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Effectiveness of personal genomic testing for disease-prevention behavior when combined with careful consultation with a physician: a preliminary study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, April 2018
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3 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Effectiveness of personal genomic testing for disease-prevention behavior when combined with careful consultation with a physician: a preliminary study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3330-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mikihiro Hayashi, Atai Watanabe, Masaaki Muramatsu, Naohide Yamashita

Abstract

There are many direct-to-consumer (DTC)-type personal genomic testing (PGT) services commercially available to the public, providing the specific disease susceptibilities of individuals. While these services do not appear to stimulate disease-prevention behavior, few studies have addressed the methods to do so. We investigated the effectiveness of combining a consultation with a physician with the delivery of test results from a DTC-type PGT, as a preliminary study to identify the effective genomic testing for disease-prevention. A prepared physician disclosed the PGT results of twenty healthy subjects and provided a specific consultation on the high-risk diseases for each subject. The effects on the sense of health, understanding of possible future diseases, and preventive behaviors for each subject were examined pre-PGT, post-PGT, and 3, 6, and 12 months post-PGT. Significant increases between the pre- and post-PGT scores were observed for the awareness of lifestyle effects on developing those diseases (P < 0.05) and the awareness of the ability to influence disease onset (P < 0.01). The follow-up questionnaire results showed that over 60% of the subjects changed their lifestyles in favor of disease prevention. These results suggest that combining the DTC-PGT with a careful physician consultation may be effective at motivating people toward preventive behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 28%
Student > Bachelor 5 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Master 3 12%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 5 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 16%
Social Sciences 3 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2018.
All research outputs
#13,083,318
of 20,327,027 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,950
of 3,990 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,206
of 295,560 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,327,027 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,990 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,560 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them