↓ Skip to main content

The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to vascular cells regulated by the HMGB1/RAGE axis: its application in cell therapy for transplant arteriosclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to vascular cells regulated by the HMGB1/RAGE axis: its application in cell therapy for transplant arteriosclerosis
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13287-018-0827-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaohu Meng, Min Chen, Wenjie Su, Xuan Tao, Mingyang Sun, Xiaoping Zou, Rongchao Ying, Wei, Baolin Wang

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation shows promise for treating transplant arteriosclerosis, at least partly via promoting endothelial regeneration. However, the efficacy and safety are still under investigation especially regarding recent findings that neointimal smooth muscle cells are derived from MSC-like cells. The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1)/receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) axis is involved in regulating proliferation, migration, and differentiation of MSCs, and therefore it can be presumably applied to improve the outcome of cell therapy. The aim of the current study was to investigate this hypothesis. Rat MSCs were treated with HMGB1 or modified with HMGB1 vectors to activate the HMGB1/RAGE axis. RAGE was targeted and inhibited by specific short hairpin RNA vectors. We assessed the capacity for cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation after vector transfection in vitro and in a rat model of transplant arteriosclerosis. The expression of CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) was determined to evaluate the differentiation of MSCs to endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Exogenous HMGB1 treatment and transfection with HMGB1 vectors promoted MSC migration and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced differentiation to CD31+cells while inhibiting their proliferation and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced differentiation to αSMA+cells. Such an effect was blocked by RAGE knockdown. HMGB1-modified cells preferably migrated to graft neointima and differentiated to CD31+cells along with significant relief of transplant arteriosclerosis and inhibition of HMGB1 and RAGE expression in graft vessels. RAGE knockdown inhibited cell migration to graft vessels. HMGB1 stimulated MSCs to migrate and differentiate to endothelial cells via RAGE signaling, which we translated to successful application in cell therapy for transplant arteriosclerosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 19%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Engineering 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 8 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2018.
All research outputs
#7,387,443
of 13,793,900 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#493
of 1,214 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,927
of 274,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,793,900 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,214 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,244 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them