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Phylogenomics and barcoding of Panax: toward the identification of ginseng species

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2018
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5 tweeters

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40 Dimensions

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Phylogenomics and barcoding of Panax: toward the identification of ginseng species
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12862-018-1160-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

V. Manzanilla, A. Kool, L. Nguyen Nhat, H. Nong Van, H. Le Thi Thu, H. J. de Boer

Abstract

The economic value of ginseng in the global medicinal plant trade is estimated to be in excess of US$2.1 billion. At the same time, the evolutionary placement of ginseng (Panax ginseng) and the complex evolutionary history of the genus is poorly understood despite several molecular phylogenetic studies. In this study, we use a full plastome phylogenomic framework to resolve relationships in Panax and to identify molecular markers for species discrimination. We used high-throughput sequencing of MBD2-Fc fractionated Panax DNA to supplement publicly available plastid genomes to create a phylogeny based on fully assembled and annotated plastid genomes from 60 accessions of 8 species. The plastome phylogeny based on a 163 kbp matrix resolves the sister relationship of Panax ginseng with P. quinquefolius. The closely related species P. vietnamensis is supported as sister of P. japonicus. The plastome matrix also shows that the markers trnC-rps16, trnS-trnG, and trnE-trnM could be used for unambiguous molecular identification of all the represented species in the genus. MBD2 depletion reduces the cost of plastome sequencing, which makes it a cost-effective alternative to Sanger sequencing based DNA barcoding for molecular identification. The plastome phylogeny provides a robust framework that can be used to study the evolution of morphological characters and biosynthesis pathways of ginsengosides for phylogenetic bioprospecting. Molecular identification of ginseng species is essential for authenticating ginseng in international trade and it provides an incentive for manufacturers to create authentic products with verified ingredients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Researcher 8 19%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 8 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 23%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 11 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2019.
All research outputs
#8,178,769
of 14,222,292 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,794
of 2,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,915
of 276,545 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,222,292 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,602 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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