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Change in muscle volume after steroid therapy in patients with myositis assessed using cross-sectional computed tomography

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, March 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Change in muscle volume after steroid therapy in patients with myositis assessed using cross-sectional computed tomography
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12891-018-2008-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takashi Nawata, Makoto Kubo, Takafumi Nomura, Keiji Oishi, Kosaku Shiragami, Tadayoshi Ikegami, Munemasa Okada, Shigeki Kobayashi, Masafumi Yano

Abstract

Steroid therapy, a key therapy for inflammatory, allergic, and immunological disorders, is often associated with steroid myopathy as one of the side effects. Steroid therapy is considered the first-line therapy for myositis; however, there have been no reports strictly comparing the muscle mass in patients with myositis before and after steroid therapy. Thus, it is currently unclear whether steroid therapy for such patients affects muscle volume in addition to muscle strength. We aimed to determine the change in muscle mass after steroid therapy via cross-sectional computed tomography (CT) in patients with myositis. Data from seven patients with myositis and eight controls, who were all treated with high doses of steroids, were assessed before and after steroid therapy. Clinical factors in patients with myositis included serum muscle enzyme levels and muscular strength. The cross-sectional area of skeletal muscle and the low muscle attenuation rate at the level of the caudal end of the third lumbar vertebra were obtained using CT and measured using an image analysis program for all patients. Data were subjected to statistical analysis using several well-established statistical tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for comparing paired data for each patient. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare sets of data sampled from two groups. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used for determining the correlations between two variables. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Muscular strength and serum muscle enzyme levels improved following steroid therapy in patients with myositis. In both groups, the cross-sectional areas of skeletal muscles decreased (myositis group: p = 0.0156; control group: p = 0.0391) and the low muscle attenuation rate tended to increase (myositis group: p = 0.0781; control group: p = 0.0547). In the myositis group, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease showed a tendency toward muscle volume loss (p = 0.0571). In patients with myositis treated with steroid therapy, muscle mass decreased after steroid therapy suggesting that the improvement in muscle strength was due to factors other than a change in muscle volume. Our study suggests the importance of therapies that not only improve muscle mass but also improve the quality of muscle strength.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 16%
Other 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 8 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 16%
Psychology 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Computer Science 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 13 52%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2018.
All research outputs
#4,383,516
of 16,519,376 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#879
of 3,166 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,183
of 283,228 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,519,376 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,166 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,228 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them